Event Title

Exploratory Study of Breast Cancer Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Among African American Women in S.E Wisconsin: Because Pink is Not the Only Color Associated with Breast Cancer

Presenter Information

Danielle Olsen
Razan Assad

Mentor 1

Sandra Underwood

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

While the burden of breast cancer borne by Black women is known to be significant, little is known about the perception and management of breast cancer risks in Black women. A study was therefore undertaken to: assess the breast cancer risk perceptions of Black women; assess the degree Black women discuss breast cancer risks and breast cancer risk management with their healthcare providers; assess the receptivity of Black women to breast cancer risk management interventions; and, their breast cancer screening risk management and screening practices of Black women.

The study was undertaken using a cross-sectional comparison group design.

Survey data reflective of breast cancer perceptions, family health history, health risk communication, breast cancer screening and breast cancer risk management practices were collected from a purposive sample of 800 Black women engaged in health-related and social service programs within S.E. Wisconsin using a 40-item investigator designed survey tool. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and inferential statistics.

The Extended Parallel Process Model was used to guide the study design.

While more than 75% of the Black women surveyed were assessed to have an increased risk for developing breast cancer, data analyses revealed significant deficits/gaps relative to their perceived risk, provider assessed breast cancer risk appraisal and recommendation relative to breast cancer risk management. When queried about the use of interventions to reduce risk if they were at increased risk for developing breast cancer, 87% expressed an interest in learning more about pharmacologic, surgical and behavioral breast cancer risk management interventions and clinical trials.

Given the current science and the availability of evidence-based breast care, significant reductions in breast cancer morbidity and mortality among Black women should occur. However, this will only become a reality if education and outreach are strategically targeted to women who are at risk, in need and underserved.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

Exploratory Study of Breast Cancer Risk Perceptions and Risk Management Among African American Women in S.E Wisconsin: Because Pink is Not the Only Color Associated with Breast Cancer

Union Wisconsin Room

While the burden of breast cancer borne by Black women is known to be significant, little is known about the perception and management of breast cancer risks in Black women. A study was therefore undertaken to: assess the breast cancer risk perceptions of Black women; assess the degree Black women discuss breast cancer risks and breast cancer risk management with their healthcare providers; assess the receptivity of Black women to breast cancer risk management interventions; and, their breast cancer screening risk management and screening practices of Black women.

The study was undertaken using a cross-sectional comparison group design.

Survey data reflective of breast cancer perceptions, family health history, health risk communication, breast cancer screening and breast cancer risk management practices were collected from a purposive sample of 800 Black women engaged in health-related and social service programs within S.E. Wisconsin using a 40-item investigator designed survey tool. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and inferential statistics.

The Extended Parallel Process Model was used to guide the study design.

While more than 75% of the Black women surveyed were assessed to have an increased risk for developing breast cancer, data analyses revealed significant deficits/gaps relative to their perceived risk, provider assessed breast cancer risk appraisal and recommendation relative to breast cancer risk management. When queried about the use of interventions to reduce risk if they were at increased risk for developing breast cancer, 87% expressed an interest in learning more about pharmacologic, surgical and behavioral breast cancer risk management interventions and clinical trials.

Given the current science and the availability of evidence-based breast care, significant reductions in breast cancer morbidity and mortality among Black women should occur. However, this will only become a reality if education and outreach are strategically targeted to women who are at risk, in need and underserved.