Event Title

670 nm Photobiomodulation in a Cell Model of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Presenter Information

Katherine Sheridan

Mentor 1

Janis Eells

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of vision loss with aging in developed countries. There are two forms of AMD, “wet” and “dry”. Although “wet” AMD which is caused by an overgrowth of abnormal blood vessels in the retina can be treated, there are no treatments for “dry” AMD. AMD is characterized by the loss of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The RPE performs functions that are essential for maintaining retinal homeostasis and the loss of RPE results in photoreceptor death and blindness. Photobiomodulation (PBM) by far-red (670 nm) light has been shown to act on mitochondria-mediated signaling pathways to preserve mitochondrial function, attenuate oxidative stress and prevent cell death in models of retinal disease and in small clinical trials. The long-term objective of our studies is to develop PBM as a stand-alone or adjunct therapy for the treatment of AMD and other retinal diseases. The objective of this proposal is to test the hypothesis that 670nm PBM will protect human primary RPE cells from cell injury and cell death induced by oxidative stress. Studies will be conducted in a cell culture model of AMD, human primary RPE cells exposed to oxidative stress by growing them in the presence of tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (TBPH). We will examine the ability of 670 nm PBM to protect against cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction. This study will improve our understanding of the mechanism of PBM in AMD and provide important information for FDA approval of this treatment modality.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

670 nm Photobiomodulation in a Cell Model of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Union Wisconsin Room

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of vision loss with aging in developed countries. There are two forms of AMD, “wet” and “dry”. Although “wet” AMD which is caused by an overgrowth of abnormal blood vessels in the retina can be treated, there are no treatments for “dry” AMD. AMD is characterized by the loss of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The RPE performs functions that are essential for maintaining retinal homeostasis and the loss of RPE results in photoreceptor death and blindness. Photobiomodulation (PBM) by far-red (670 nm) light has been shown to act on mitochondria-mediated signaling pathways to preserve mitochondrial function, attenuate oxidative stress and prevent cell death in models of retinal disease and in small clinical trials. The long-term objective of our studies is to develop PBM as a stand-alone or adjunct therapy for the treatment of AMD and other retinal diseases. The objective of this proposal is to test the hypothesis that 670nm PBM will protect human primary RPE cells from cell injury and cell death induced by oxidative stress. Studies will be conducted in a cell culture model of AMD, human primary RPE cells exposed to oxidative stress by growing them in the presence of tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (TBPH). We will examine the ability of 670 nm PBM to protect against cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction. This study will improve our understanding of the mechanism of PBM in AMD and provide important information for FDA approval of this treatment modality.