Event Title

Effects of Lithium Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles on Daphnia magna

Presenter Information

Evan Bennett

Mentor 1

Rebecca Klaper

Mentor 2

Nicklaus Neureuther

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

Nanotechnology has emerged as a novel technique to solve problems in material science, with new nanomaterials being produced for numerous purposes, having numerous applications across many consumer products. For example, Lithium cobalt oxide (LCO), are metals commonly used in batteries, which are currently being engineered as nanoparticles to enhance specific qualities of the battery. Batteries are typically disposed of in landfills rather than recycled, and therefore may inadvertently be introduced into the environment, causing detrimental impacts to organisms. Therefore, it is essential to screen for these effects early on in the development of these particles, which is the goal of The Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology. We will be studying the effects of LCO nanoblocks on the model organism Daphnia magna. Daphnia magna are commonly used as a model organism for environmental toxicity due to their importance in the food web as primary consumers, quick lifecycles, and their ability to remain viable in lab cultures with relative ease. Another benefit for using Daphnia is that they reproduce asexually via parthenogenesis, essentially making clones of themselves, ensuring that DNA lineages are kept constant in the culture. This study will expose Daphnia magna to LCO nanoblocks at concentrations of .1, 1, and 10 mg/l for 48 hours as well as a chronic exposure measuring reproductive impacts. Nanoparticles can affect the organisms in several ways, such as altering DNA, interacting with the cell membrane, or interfering with normal cell processes, depending on the properties and shape of the molecule. Earlier studies seem to indicate that rod-like molecules are more toxic to cells, but there is little known on the effect of nanoblocks on cell function. Consequently, adverse effects on survival will be a measured endpoint as well as gene expression to determine the effects on metabolism and detoxification.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

Effects of Lithium Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles on Daphnia magna

Union Wisconsin Room

Nanotechnology has emerged as a novel technique to solve problems in material science, with new nanomaterials being produced for numerous purposes, having numerous applications across many consumer products. For example, Lithium cobalt oxide (LCO), are metals commonly used in batteries, which are currently being engineered as nanoparticles to enhance specific qualities of the battery. Batteries are typically disposed of in landfills rather than recycled, and therefore may inadvertently be introduced into the environment, causing detrimental impacts to organisms. Therefore, it is essential to screen for these effects early on in the development of these particles, which is the goal of The Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology. We will be studying the effects of LCO nanoblocks on the model organism Daphnia magna. Daphnia magna are commonly used as a model organism for environmental toxicity due to their importance in the food web as primary consumers, quick lifecycles, and their ability to remain viable in lab cultures with relative ease. Another benefit for using Daphnia is that they reproduce asexually via parthenogenesis, essentially making clones of themselves, ensuring that DNA lineages are kept constant in the culture. This study will expose Daphnia magna to LCO nanoblocks at concentrations of .1, 1, and 10 mg/l for 48 hours as well as a chronic exposure measuring reproductive impacts. Nanoparticles can affect the organisms in several ways, such as altering DNA, interacting with the cell membrane, or interfering with normal cell processes, depending on the properties and shape of the molecule. Earlier studies seem to indicate that rod-like molecules are more toxic to cells, but there is little known on the effect of nanoblocks on cell function. Consequently, adverse effects on survival will be a measured endpoint as well as gene expression to determine the effects on metabolism and detoxification.