Event Title

Effects of Childhood Trauma and Exposure Community Violence on the Development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Presenter Information

Ciara Ayala

Mentor 1

Christine Larson

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

This research is part of a larger study known as iSTAR which focuses on identifying neurobiologic and psychological markers of risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As part of this study we collected data to identify whether there is a correlation between childhood trauma, exposure to community violence and the severity of PTSD symptoms in civilians whom have recently been involved in a traumatic event. We recruit participants from the Emergency Department at Froedtert Hospital and have them undergo multiple assessments measuring their risk for developing PTSD. Self-report measures of childhood trauma, community violence exposure, and current PTSD symptoms were administered two weeks and 6 months post injury. From the data that we have collected we have found a positive correlation between the measures. Meaning, the participants that have had a significant amount of childhood trauma and have lived in a community where they were exposed to different forms of violence do have a higher probability developing PTSD from a recent traumatic event. These findings will be beneficial for future diagnosis and prevention of PTSD.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

Effects of Childhood Trauma and Exposure Community Violence on the Development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Union Wisconsin Room

This research is part of a larger study known as iSTAR which focuses on identifying neurobiologic and psychological markers of risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As part of this study we collected data to identify whether there is a correlation between childhood trauma, exposure to community violence and the severity of PTSD symptoms in civilians whom have recently been involved in a traumatic event. We recruit participants from the Emergency Department at Froedtert Hospital and have them undergo multiple assessments measuring their risk for developing PTSD. Self-report measures of childhood trauma, community violence exposure, and current PTSD symptoms were administered two weeks and 6 months post injury. From the data that we have collected we have found a positive correlation between the measures. Meaning, the participants that have had a significant amount of childhood trauma and have lived in a community where they were exposed to different forms of violence do have a higher probability developing PTSD from a recent traumatic event. These findings will be beneficial for future diagnosis and prevention of PTSD.