Event Title

Promoting Positive Mental Health: The Protective Role of Education and Social Support in Reducing the Impact of Childhood Adversity

Presenter Information

Pilar Olvera

Mentor 1

Colleen Janczewski

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

Numerous studies have shown a strong relationship between exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and negative health, social, and behavioral outcomes throughout the lifespan. Although the effects of childhood adversity are well documented for negative mental health outcomes, less is known about its influence on constructs of positive mental health. The current study examines ACE’s effect on two mental health outcomes: anxiety and positive well-being. Moreover, we examine whether social support and education attainment operate as protective factors to reduce the impact of ACEs on anxiety and positive adult well-being. The data is collected as part of the Wisconsin Alternative Response Project, which is an evaluation of the Child Protective Services (CPS) system in Wisconsin. The sample consists of 400 CPS-involved caregivers. First, the sample will be described using prevalence and means of study measures. We will then examine the relationship among ACEs, anxiety and positive well-being. Finally, we will conduct a mediation analysis to determine if education and social support mitigate the influence of ACEs on the study outcomes, while accounting for participant characteristics such as race, gender, and age. Preliminary results indicate that 35.0% of CPS respondents experienced four or more ACEs. ACEs were significantly associated with anxiety (r = .32, p < .01); positive well-being (r = -.16, p < .01) and social support (r = -.22; p < .01), but not education. Social support was associated with anxiety (r = -.283, p = .01) and well-being (r = .33, p < .01) whereas education was only associated with well-being (r =.23, p < .01). Mediation results are forthcoming. These findings suggest that education and social support intervention early in the life-course may lessen the impact of ACEs on adult mental health.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

Promoting Positive Mental Health: The Protective Role of Education and Social Support in Reducing the Impact of Childhood Adversity

Union Wisconsin Room

Numerous studies have shown a strong relationship between exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and negative health, social, and behavioral outcomes throughout the lifespan. Although the effects of childhood adversity are well documented for negative mental health outcomes, less is known about its influence on constructs of positive mental health. The current study examines ACE’s effect on two mental health outcomes: anxiety and positive well-being. Moreover, we examine whether social support and education attainment operate as protective factors to reduce the impact of ACEs on anxiety and positive adult well-being. The data is collected as part of the Wisconsin Alternative Response Project, which is an evaluation of the Child Protective Services (CPS) system in Wisconsin. The sample consists of 400 CPS-involved caregivers. First, the sample will be described using prevalence and means of study measures. We will then examine the relationship among ACEs, anxiety and positive well-being. Finally, we will conduct a mediation analysis to determine if education and social support mitigate the influence of ACEs on the study outcomes, while accounting for participant characteristics such as race, gender, and age. Preliminary results indicate that 35.0% of CPS respondents experienced four or more ACEs. ACEs were significantly associated with anxiety (r = .32, p < .01); positive well-being (r = -.16, p < .01) and social support (r = -.22; p < .01), but not education. Social support was associated with anxiety (r = -.283, p = .01) and well-being (r = .33, p < .01) whereas education was only associated with well-being (r =.23, p < .01). Mediation results are forthcoming. These findings suggest that education and social support intervention early in the life-course may lessen the impact of ACEs on adult mental health.