Event Title

Mate Preference Function Variation Throughout the Life of Female Enchenopa binotata Treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae)

Mentor 1

Rafael Rodriguez

Location

Union 240

Start Date

5-4-2019 12:20 PM

Description

The fundamental process of finding a mate varies among species and can include a variety of mating signals, displays, and courtship rituals. Mating decisions arise from the interactions of both mate preference functions and choosiness. Preference functions rank the attractiveness of a given potential male’s trait to an individual female; while choosiness is the effort a female will expend in obtaining a preferred mate. In this study, we test the hypothesis that mate preference functions vary with female age to help ensure reproductive success. We analyzed the vibrational mating responses of females of Enchenopa binotata (Two-Marked treehoppers) weekly from reproductive maturity until their deaths. By presenting the females with playbacks simulating male signals and varying their dominant frequency (140-240Hz), we were able to determine the phenotypic traits the females found ‘attractive’. We implemented a function-valued approach to analyze lifetime variation in mate preferences in terms of four main traits describing the functions: peak preference, overall responsiveness, tolerance, and strength.

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Apr 5th, 12:20 PM

Mate Preference Function Variation Throughout the Life of Female Enchenopa binotata Treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae)

Union 240

The fundamental process of finding a mate varies among species and can include a variety of mating signals, displays, and courtship rituals. Mating decisions arise from the interactions of both mate preference functions and choosiness. Preference functions rank the attractiveness of a given potential male’s trait to an individual female; while choosiness is the effort a female will expend in obtaining a preferred mate. In this study, we test the hypothesis that mate preference functions vary with female age to help ensure reproductive success. We analyzed the vibrational mating responses of females of Enchenopa binotata (Two-Marked treehoppers) weekly from reproductive maturity until their deaths. By presenting the females with playbacks simulating male signals and varying their dominant frequency (140-240Hz), we were able to determine the phenotypic traits the females found ‘attractive’. We implemented a function-valued approach to analyze lifetime variation in mate preferences in terms of four main traits describing the functions: peak preference, overall responsiveness, tolerance, and strength.