Event Title

Bacteria Hand-Held Sensor

Mentor 1

Marcia Silva

Mentor 2

Thomas Hansen

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

5-4-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2019 3:30 PM

Description

Water quality testing typically indirectly measures the amount of Escherichia Coli (E. coli) in water by measuring the Fecal Indicator Bacteria amount. This study introduces a sensor that improves upon the stated testing process by directly testing for bacteria of all types by having a computer program view and count the biotic and non-biotic particles in water using Digital Inline Holographic Microscopy (DIHM) with blob detection. The results show a correlation between the bacteria concentration of E. coli provided to the sensor and counted through traditional methods to the number of particles counted by the sensor. The relationship shows that the sensor is effective. With the time to acquire results being less than 20 minutes, versus waiting 18 hours to perform a colony count using the United States of America’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1603, and with the sensor’s cost of less than 300 USD, the sensor is effective, fast, and affordable.

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Apr 5th, 1:30 PM Apr 5th, 3:30 PM

Bacteria Hand-Held Sensor

Union Wisconsin Room

Water quality testing typically indirectly measures the amount of Escherichia Coli (E. coli) in water by measuring the Fecal Indicator Bacteria amount. This study introduces a sensor that improves upon the stated testing process by directly testing for bacteria of all types by having a computer program view and count the biotic and non-biotic particles in water using Digital Inline Holographic Microscopy (DIHM) with blob detection. The results show a correlation between the bacteria concentration of E. coli provided to the sensor and counted through traditional methods to the number of particles counted by the sensor. The relationship shows that the sensor is effective. With the time to acquire results being less than 20 minutes, versus waiting 18 hours to perform a colony count using the United States of America’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1603, and with the sensor’s cost of less than 300 USD, the sensor is effective, fast, and affordable.