Event Title

Precision of Multi-segment Foot Model Anatomical Landmark Identification

Mentor 1

Steven Cobb

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

5-4-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2019 3:30 PM

Description

Background and Rationale: Multi-segment foot models allow measurement of the movement (kinematics) of multiple joints within the foot (e.g. rearfoot, midfoot, forefoot) during gait. Kinematics must be repeatable across testing sessions and testers (e.g. researchers in different labs/clinics) for the data to be clinically relevant. Two of the most common sources of error associated with kinematic gait studies are skin movement artifact and anatomical landmark location variability. The precise identification of anatomical landmarks is critical to the subsequent joint motion calculations. The aim of this study is to investigate the within-tester and between-tester precision of placing markers on leg and foot bone anatomical landmarks for a surface marker based multi-segment foot model. Methods: 10 apparently healthy participants (age 18 – 44 years) will be recruited from UWM and the surrounding community. First, an initial screening procedure for inclusion/exclusion criteria will be completed. Then, anatomical landmarks on the right leg (medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, tibial tuberosity) and foot (calcaneus, navicular, cuboid, metatarsals, hallux) will be palpated. Reflective markers will be placed on the skin over the anatomical landmarks. Next, the participant will stand and the positions of the markers will be captured for 1 s by a 14 camera motion capture system. All of the reflective markers will then be removed and a second tester will complete the procedures. Finally, each participant will return within one week and the procedures will be repeated by both testers. Results: Within- and between- tester precision will be calculated as the root mean square (RMS) of the deviation between the positions of the anatomical landmarks in a trial and the landmarks mean position. Conclusions: The data collected in the current study will be the first to provide information related to the precision of anatomical landmark location associated with a kinematic multi-segment foot model.

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Apr 5th, 1:30 PM Apr 5th, 3:30 PM

Precision of Multi-segment Foot Model Anatomical Landmark Identification

Union Wisconsin Room

Background and Rationale: Multi-segment foot models allow measurement of the movement (kinematics) of multiple joints within the foot (e.g. rearfoot, midfoot, forefoot) during gait. Kinematics must be repeatable across testing sessions and testers (e.g. researchers in different labs/clinics) for the data to be clinically relevant. Two of the most common sources of error associated with kinematic gait studies are skin movement artifact and anatomical landmark location variability. The precise identification of anatomical landmarks is critical to the subsequent joint motion calculations. The aim of this study is to investigate the within-tester and between-tester precision of placing markers on leg and foot bone anatomical landmarks for a surface marker based multi-segment foot model. Methods: 10 apparently healthy participants (age 18 – 44 years) will be recruited from UWM and the surrounding community. First, an initial screening procedure for inclusion/exclusion criteria will be completed. Then, anatomical landmarks on the right leg (medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, tibial tuberosity) and foot (calcaneus, navicular, cuboid, metatarsals, hallux) will be palpated. Reflective markers will be placed on the skin over the anatomical landmarks. Next, the participant will stand and the positions of the markers will be captured for 1 s by a 14 camera motion capture system. All of the reflective markers will then be removed and a second tester will complete the procedures. Finally, each participant will return within one week and the procedures will be repeated by both testers. Results: Within- and between- tester precision will be calculated as the root mean square (RMS) of the deviation between the positions of the anatomical landmarks in a trial and the landmarks mean position. Conclusions: The data collected in the current study will be the first to provide information related to the precision of anatomical landmark location associated with a kinematic multi-segment foot model.