Event Title

Working Memory Filtering Efficiency of Threatening Words

Mentor 1

Christine Larson

Start Date

1-5-2020 12:00 AM

Description

In the current study, we examined if working memory was also impacted by threatening words, specifically investigating working memory filtering efficiency of threatening words. Using Electroencephalography (EEG), we recorded 54 undergraduates as they completed a change detection task consisting of 4 conditions: one neutral target word, two neutral target words, one neutral target word combined with one neutral distracter word, and one neutral target word combined with one threatening distracter word. We measured the contralateral delay activity (CDA), and event-related potential (ERP) that provides an index of working memory filtering efficiency for distracters. By using the CDA, we were able to calculate one’s filtering efficiency using a well-validated formula taking into account the low and high loads in relation to the distracter load. We conducted group level analyses by using repeated measures ANOVA for each dependent variable of interest. The results from our behavioral analyses showed no differences in filtering efficiency for neutral distractors compared to threatening distractors. In addition, our CDA analyses yielded null differences in filtering efficiency. Contrary to our group level analyses, moderation multiple regression results displayed an interaction between working memory capacity and attentional control. This predicted the ability to efficiently filter threatening words, but not neutral words. This same pattern was observed for individuals with average working memory capacity. However, for individuals with high working memory capacity, level of attentional control did not matter in terms of predicting filtering efficiency. Our findings add to the literature examining working memory filtering efficiency of threatening stimuli.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

Working Memory Filtering Efficiency of Threatening Words

In the current study, we examined if working memory was also impacted by threatening words, specifically investigating working memory filtering efficiency of threatening words. Using Electroencephalography (EEG), we recorded 54 undergraduates as they completed a change detection task consisting of 4 conditions: one neutral target word, two neutral target words, one neutral target word combined with one neutral distracter word, and one neutral target word combined with one threatening distracter word. We measured the contralateral delay activity (CDA), and event-related potential (ERP) that provides an index of working memory filtering efficiency for distracters. By using the CDA, we were able to calculate one’s filtering efficiency using a well-validated formula taking into account the low and high loads in relation to the distracter load. We conducted group level analyses by using repeated measures ANOVA for each dependent variable of interest. The results from our behavioral analyses showed no differences in filtering efficiency for neutral distractors compared to threatening distractors. In addition, our CDA analyses yielded null differences in filtering efficiency. Contrary to our group level analyses, moderation multiple regression results displayed an interaction between working memory capacity and attentional control. This predicted the ability to efficiently filter threatening words, but not neutral words. This same pattern was observed for individuals with average working memory capacity. However, for individuals with high working memory capacity, level of attentional control did not matter in terms of predicting filtering efficiency. Our findings add to the literature examining working memory filtering efficiency of threatening stimuli.