Event Title

Mathematical Model of Liposome-Mediated Drug Delivery to Brain Capillary Networks

Mentor 1

Peter Hinow

Start Date

1-5-2020 12:00 AM

Description

The process of delivering drugs to the brain is complicated by the presence of the blood-brain barrier. Recent research in pharmaceutical science has focused on liposomes that can release their cargo when exposed to an ultrasound signa. Mathematical modeling and simulation help understanding of the transport processes in the blood, across the blood-brain barrier and within the tissue. Building on earlier work, we present a mathematical model for drug delivery through capillary networks with increasingly complex geometries and topologies. The model is applied to the delivery of L-Dopa, the primary drug used in the therapy of Parkinson’s Disease. Our model imitates blood flow rates and ratios previously seen in between plasma and tissue concentrations. The model will be tested with experimental observations from pharmaceutical scientists at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

Mathematical Model of Liposome-Mediated Drug Delivery to Brain Capillary Networks

The process of delivering drugs to the brain is complicated by the presence of the blood-brain barrier. Recent research in pharmaceutical science has focused on liposomes that can release their cargo when exposed to an ultrasound signa. Mathematical modeling and simulation help understanding of the transport processes in the blood, across the blood-brain barrier and within the tissue. Building on earlier work, we present a mathematical model for drug delivery through capillary networks with increasingly complex geometries and topologies. The model is applied to the delivery of L-Dopa, the primary drug used in the therapy of Parkinson’s Disease. Our model imitates blood flow rates and ratios previously seen in between plasma and tissue concentrations. The model will be tested with experimental observations from pharmaceutical scientists at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand