Event Title

Analyzing Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with the Three Impulsivity Factors

Mentor 1

Abel Matthews

Start Date

1-5-2020 12:00 AM

Description

This current study is based on the analyses done from a previous study looking at the correlation between response inhibition (RI) and impulsivity with obsessive compulsion disorder (OCD). “Obsessive-compulsive disorder” OCD characterized by recurring and/or unwanted thoughts or sensations that may lead to compulsive behavior (American Psychiatric Association (APA), 2013). Although compulsive behaviors are premeditated while impulsive behaviors are not, literature has shown that impulsivity may predict OCD symptoms (Potenzia et al., 2009). This current study was based on a larger body of work evaluating response inhibition in an analogue OCD sample. The goal of our study was to evaluate which features of impulsivity (i.e., motor, non-planning, attention) were associated with OCD, after controlling for emotional symptoms like depression, anxiety, and stress (Carter et al.,2005). We hypothesized that individuals with OCD would have significantly elevated impulsivity symptoms across all three domains after controlling for emotional symptoms. The sample included 701 individuals from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. These individuals were an analog population, where participants are varied in interest (APA, 2013).To evaluate emotional and impulsivity symptoms, participants completed the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21) and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), respectively. To determine the influence of impulsivity on OC-severity the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory Revised (OCIR). A two-step hierarchical linear regression was run, where Step 1 included DASS-21, and Step 2 included BIS factors. The findings revealed that the non-planning factor impulsivity was a significant predictor of OCIR symptoms over emotional symptoms (R2 Δ = 34.1, p=.004). In contrast, neither the attention nor motor factor significantly predicted influence emotional symptoms (R2 Δ=0.000, p= 0.974, p= 0.981). The findings suggest that the individuals who are higher in symptoms of non-planning such as finding enjoyment of challenging tasks, demonstrate higher OC-symptoms.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

Analyzing Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with the Three Impulsivity Factors

This current study is based on the analyses done from a previous study looking at the correlation between response inhibition (RI) and impulsivity with obsessive compulsion disorder (OCD). “Obsessive-compulsive disorder” OCD characterized by recurring and/or unwanted thoughts or sensations that may lead to compulsive behavior (American Psychiatric Association (APA), 2013). Although compulsive behaviors are premeditated while impulsive behaviors are not, literature has shown that impulsivity may predict OCD symptoms (Potenzia et al., 2009). This current study was based on a larger body of work evaluating response inhibition in an analogue OCD sample. The goal of our study was to evaluate which features of impulsivity (i.e., motor, non-planning, attention) were associated with OCD, after controlling for emotional symptoms like depression, anxiety, and stress (Carter et al.,2005). We hypothesized that individuals with OCD would have significantly elevated impulsivity symptoms across all three domains after controlling for emotional symptoms. The sample included 701 individuals from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. These individuals were an analog population, where participants are varied in interest (APA, 2013).To evaluate emotional and impulsivity symptoms, participants completed the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21) and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), respectively. To determine the influence of impulsivity on OC-severity the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory Revised (OCIR). A two-step hierarchical linear regression was run, where Step 1 included DASS-21, and Step 2 included BIS factors. The findings revealed that the non-planning factor impulsivity was a significant predictor of OCIR symptoms over emotional symptoms (R2 Δ = 34.1, p=.004). In contrast, neither the attention nor motor factor significantly predicted influence emotional symptoms (R2 Δ=0.000, p= 0.974, p= 0.981). The findings suggest that the individuals who are higher in symptoms of non-planning such as finding enjoyment of challenging tasks, demonstrate higher OC-symptoms.