Event Title

Monitoring Canal Water: A Case Study

Mentor 1

Marcia Silva

Mentor 2

Tom Hansen

Start Date

1-5-2020 12:00 AM

Description

Canal systems are integral to certain parts of the world in order to give people access to water. In the town of Gilbert, Arizona, this water was primarily so farmers could water their crops despite the normally dry climate. However, recent changes have shifted the customer base of the irrigation water. Gilbert has extensively developed former farmland into suburban neighborhoods. The canal water has never had extensive testing before since it’s not drinking water and it doesn’t get in contact with people. Since suburban neighborhoods have become adjacent to the canal, direct and indirect human contact with the water has become a higher probability. A team at UWM has developed a low-cost fast-data particle sensor, that has demonstrated ability to count particles in environmental water and has also shown the ability to count microorganisms in pure water. Water samples have been collected at different points of the canal in order to analyze the full length using the sensor and other lab tests. Preliminary results show rises in conductivity and dips in particle counts downstream of canal and highway intersections. These results could show possibility of monitoring runoff pollution from roads into water systems.

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May 1st, 12:00 AM

Monitoring Canal Water: A Case Study

Canal systems are integral to certain parts of the world in order to give people access to water. In the town of Gilbert, Arizona, this water was primarily so farmers could water their crops despite the normally dry climate. However, recent changes have shifted the customer base of the irrigation water. Gilbert has extensively developed former farmland into suburban neighborhoods. The canal water has never had extensive testing before since it’s not drinking water and it doesn’t get in contact with people. Since suburban neighborhoods have become adjacent to the canal, direct and indirect human contact with the water has become a higher probability. A team at UWM has developed a low-cost fast-data particle sensor, that has demonstrated ability to count particles in environmental water and has also shown the ability to count microorganisms in pure water. Water samples have been collected at different points of the canal in order to analyze the full length using the sensor and other lab tests. Preliminary results show rises in conductivity and dips in particle counts downstream of canal and highway intersections. These results could show possibility of monitoring runoff pollution from roads into water systems.