Event Title

Known Group Validity of the AccessPlace Building Accessibility App among Individuals with Motor, Cognitive, Hearing, and Visual Impairments.

Mentor 1

Nathan Spaeth

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

Although the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) mandate accessibility requirements for public buildings, people with disabilities are still limited from participating within the community. Additionally, crowd-sourced review sites such as Yelp and Google fail to provide information on accessibility for their users. AccessPlace is a web application designed to provide personalized accessibility information of community buildings based on a user’s profile. The purpose of this study is to test the Known-Groups validity of AccessPlace ratings among its users to document the relevancy of personalized reviews. We hypothesize that AccessPlace will validate ratings among users of the same impairment type and discriminate amongst other impairment types. The objective includes determining the Known-Groups validity for the AccessPlace app to identify whether AccessPlace can discriminate ratings among people with motor, cognitive, visual, and hearing impairments using the personalized profiles. Upon Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, researchers will recruit participants through Milwaukee area disability organizations. The participants will rate two restaurants based on one positive and negative experience. Pre- and post-surveys will be conducted via Qualtrics to determine the usefulness of AccessPlace reviews. Once data collection is finalized, two statistical analyses will be performed to investigate the agreement among and between varying impairment types. Fleiss’ Kappa will be used to investigate the agreement between raters of the same impairment group using AccessPlace data. In addition, researchers will perform a second statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA) to investigate the agreement between raters of different impairment groups using the AccessPlace Rating Survey results. We expect the data to suggest the need to explore ratings among the same impairment groups to validate AccessPlace findings for these populations. If the outcomes of the study are as expected, future implementation will include replication with a larger group of participants to more definitively document the Known-Group validity.

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Apr 16th, 12:00 AM

Known Group Validity of the AccessPlace Building Accessibility App among Individuals with Motor, Cognitive, Hearing, and Visual Impairments.

Although the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) mandate accessibility requirements for public buildings, people with disabilities are still limited from participating within the community. Additionally, crowd-sourced review sites such as Yelp and Google fail to provide information on accessibility for their users. AccessPlace is a web application designed to provide personalized accessibility information of community buildings based on a user’s profile. The purpose of this study is to test the Known-Groups validity of AccessPlace ratings among its users to document the relevancy of personalized reviews. We hypothesize that AccessPlace will validate ratings among users of the same impairment type and discriminate amongst other impairment types. The objective includes determining the Known-Groups validity for the AccessPlace app to identify whether AccessPlace can discriminate ratings among people with motor, cognitive, visual, and hearing impairments using the personalized profiles. Upon Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, researchers will recruit participants through Milwaukee area disability organizations. The participants will rate two restaurants based on one positive and negative experience. Pre- and post-surveys will be conducted via Qualtrics to determine the usefulness of AccessPlace reviews. Once data collection is finalized, two statistical analyses will be performed to investigate the agreement among and between varying impairment types. Fleiss’ Kappa will be used to investigate the agreement between raters of the same impairment group using AccessPlace data. In addition, researchers will perform a second statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA) to investigate the agreement between raters of different impairment groups using the AccessPlace Rating Survey results. We expect the data to suggest the need to explore ratings among the same impairment groups to validate AccessPlace findings for these populations. If the outcomes of the study are as expected, future implementation will include replication with a larger group of participants to more definitively document the Known-Group validity.