Event Title

Description of Teen Dating Violence in the Dominican Republic

Mentor 1

Heidi Luft

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

Despite high rates of intimate partner violence and homicide in the Dominican Republic (DR), research on prevention in this country is extremely limited. Dating violence prevention programs with youth in the US are effective and can reduce risk for more serious violence as adults. Prior to their implementation with youth in the DR, program content and measures used to evaluate program effectiveness must be adapted for culture and context. Describe teen dating violence in the DR.We recruited students, teachers, principals, and regional directors from schools in four provinces located in the southern region of the DR. Data were collected via interviews and focus groups. We conducted deductive content analysis of the Spanish transcripts, to identify examples of commonly examined forms of dating violence. Data were analyzed from X students, X teachers, 2 principals, and 3 regional directors. Stakeholders reported in-person and cyber dating violence that varied in severity and form. Specific examples of physical and sexual violence, emotional/verbal and relational aggression, and threatening and stalking behaviors were provided. Characteristics of dating violence described by stakeholders in the DR are similar to those reported in other settings. However, dating violence programs and measures should be adapted to reflect specific examples and terminology used by youth in the DR.

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Apr 16th, 12:00 AM

Description of Teen Dating Violence in the Dominican Republic

Despite high rates of intimate partner violence and homicide in the Dominican Republic (DR), research on prevention in this country is extremely limited. Dating violence prevention programs with youth in the US are effective and can reduce risk for more serious violence as adults. Prior to their implementation with youth in the DR, program content and measures used to evaluate program effectiveness must be adapted for culture and context. Describe teen dating violence in the DR.We recruited students, teachers, principals, and regional directors from schools in four provinces located in the southern region of the DR. Data were collected via interviews and focus groups. We conducted deductive content analysis of the Spanish transcripts, to identify examples of commonly examined forms of dating violence. Data were analyzed from X students, X teachers, 2 principals, and 3 regional directors. Stakeholders reported in-person and cyber dating violence that varied in severity and form. Specific examples of physical and sexual violence, emotional/verbal and relational aggression, and threatening and stalking behaviors were provided. Characteristics of dating violence described by stakeholders in the DR are similar to those reported in other settings. However, dating violence programs and measures should be adapted to reflect specific examples and terminology used by youth in the DR.