Event Title

Comparison of Pre and Post-Op Thoracohumeral Kinematics in Individuals with Rotator Cuff Tears

Mentor 1

Alyssa Schnorenberg

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

The rotator cuff (RC) is a group of muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis) which contribute to the motion and stability of the glenohumeral joint. A tear in one or more RC muscles often results in pain and decreased shoulder mobility, which can make it difficult for the injured to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). This study examined the progress of standard RC tear rehabilitation by comparing injured and non-injured joint kinematics during a common ADL. Participants with an RC tear were recorded with a 15 camera Vicon T-Series system at 120 Hz performing a reach to back pocket task (simulating perineal care) with their injured and non-injured arms. Participants were evaluated 3 months before (pre-op), 3 months after (post-op 1), and 6 months after (post-op 2) RC repair surgery. An inverse kinematics model calculated the 3D thoracohumeral joint angles for each arm. The range of motion (ROM) in each plane was determined by taking the difference between the peak angles. One representative participant is reported. The coronal plane ROM of the injured arm was less at pre-op (7.3⁰±2.4⁰), similar at post-op 1 (17.4⁰±2.2⁰), and greater at post-op 2 (30.2⁰±3.6⁰), in comparison to the non-injured arm (15.8⁰±2.4⁰). The transverse plane ROM of the injured arm was less at both pre-op (15.9⁰±0.9⁰) and post-op 1 (18.0⁰±2.2⁰), and similar at post-op 2 (31.4⁰±3.8⁰) in comparison to the non-injured arm (27.4⁰±4.2⁰). The sagittal ROM of the injured arm was similar at pre-op (50.7⁰±1.4⁰), and more at post-op 1 (52.1⁰±0.3⁰) and post-op 2 (57.1⁰±0.9⁰) in comparison to the non-injured arm (47.0⁰±6.3⁰). We successfully calculated the 3D thoracohumeral joint kinematics during the back-pocket ADL before and after a RC repair surgery for one participant. Current work is underway to include more participants to elucidate patterns of rehabilitation.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 12:00 AM

Comparison of Pre and Post-Op Thoracohumeral Kinematics in Individuals with Rotator Cuff Tears

The rotator cuff (RC) is a group of muscles (supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis) which contribute to the motion and stability of the glenohumeral joint. A tear in one or more RC muscles often results in pain and decreased shoulder mobility, which can make it difficult for the injured to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). This study examined the progress of standard RC tear rehabilitation by comparing injured and non-injured joint kinematics during a common ADL. Participants with an RC tear were recorded with a 15 camera Vicon T-Series system at 120 Hz performing a reach to back pocket task (simulating perineal care) with their injured and non-injured arms. Participants were evaluated 3 months before (pre-op), 3 months after (post-op 1), and 6 months after (post-op 2) RC repair surgery. An inverse kinematics model calculated the 3D thoracohumeral joint angles for each arm. The range of motion (ROM) in each plane was determined by taking the difference between the peak angles. One representative participant is reported. The coronal plane ROM of the injured arm was less at pre-op (7.3⁰±2.4⁰), similar at post-op 1 (17.4⁰±2.2⁰), and greater at post-op 2 (30.2⁰±3.6⁰), in comparison to the non-injured arm (15.8⁰±2.4⁰). The transverse plane ROM of the injured arm was less at both pre-op (15.9⁰±0.9⁰) and post-op 1 (18.0⁰±2.2⁰), and similar at post-op 2 (31.4⁰±3.8⁰) in comparison to the non-injured arm (27.4⁰±4.2⁰). The sagittal ROM of the injured arm was similar at pre-op (50.7⁰±1.4⁰), and more at post-op 1 (52.1⁰±0.3⁰) and post-op 2 (57.1⁰±0.9⁰) in comparison to the non-injured arm (47.0⁰±6.3⁰). We successfully calculated the 3D thoracohumeral joint kinematics during the back-pocket ADL before and after a RC repair surgery for one participant. Current work is underway to include more participants to elucidate patterns of rehabilitation.