Event Title

Phase Three: Annual Update

Mentor 1

Trudy Watt

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

In the proposed video, UWM-SARUP’s Phase III design research team, presents their journey. Rooted in a radically hospitable and compassionate environment, we seek to transform the architectural field by applying qualitative data analysis and machine learning methods to produce inclusive, stimulating environments that improve users’ spatial experience. We focus on design that is finely tuned to occupant needs, health, and overall quality of life. Each member is valued in a way that promotes and prioritizes wellness. To achieve full potential at the individual and team level, members engage in a highly collaborative, non-hierarchical setting that aids us in uncovering where the team can improve, as well as understanding our personal strengths. Frequent reflection and measurement are imperative to our work in exploring compassionate design for aging adults experiencing cognitive decline. The team is currently working on various projects; Know Thyself, a digital group storytelling interface, and rapid analytic design research to connect design and science. Know Thyself focuses on meaningfully integrating the lived experiences of older adults into residential design through machine learning and storytelling interview methods. We explore emerging applications of artificial intelligence to analyze data gathered from TimeSlips-based storytelling sessions and influence the early phases of the design process. Phase III proposed ‘Storytelling Suitcase’ packages, equipped with an interactive digital interface that allows for storytelling sessions to be conducted virtually. Alongside storytelling-based research, the team pursues ways to merge scientific research and design practice around person-centered care through developing rapid analytical visualizations. After literature review, the team conducted a workshop connecting design and science, submitted a manuscript to The Gerontologist journal, and continues to explore perspectives on healthy aging in the built environment.

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Apr 16th, 12:00 AM

Phase Three: Annual Update

In the proposed video, UWM-SARUP’s Phase III design research team, presents their journey. Rooted in a radically hospitable and compassionate environment, we seek to transform the architectural field by applying qualitative data analysis and machine learning methods to produce inclusive, stimulating environments that improve users’ spatial experience. We focus on design that is finely tuned to occupant needs, health, and overall quality of life. Each member is valued in a way that promotes and prioritizes wellness. To achieve full potential at the individual and team level, members engage in a highly collaborative, non-hierarchical setting that aids us in uncovering where the team can improve, as well as understanding our personal strengths. Frequent reflection and measurement are imperative to our work in exploring compassionate design for aging adults experiencing cognitive decline. The team is currently working on various projects; Know Thyself, a digital group storytelling interface, and rapid analytic design research to connect design and science. Know Thyself focuses on meaningfully integrating the lived experiences of older adults into residential design through machine learning and storytelling interview methods. We explore emerging applications of artificial intelligence to analyze data gathered from TimeSlips-based storytelling sessions and influence the early phases of the design process. Phase III proposed ‘Storytelling Suitcase’ packages, equipped with an interactive digital interface that allows for storytelling sessions to be conducted virtually. Alongside storytelling-based research, the team pursues ways to merge scientific research and design practice around person-centered care through developing rapid analytical visualizations. After literature review, the team conducted a workshop connecting design and science, submitted a manuscript to The Gerontologist journal, and continues to explore perspectives on healthy aging in the built environment.