Event Title

Co-Use of Alcohol and Cannabis: Associations with Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Adolescents

Mentor 1

Krista Lisdahl

Mentor 2

Elizabeth Stinson

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

Alcohol and cannabis are frequently used substances among adolescents and have been associated with negative mental health outcomes. Specifically, research has shown alcohol (Hassan, 2018) and cannabis use (Lisdahl et al., 2007; Wright et al., 2016) independently linked with greater depressive symptoms, with the relationship with anxiety symptoms being less clear (Keith et al., 2015; McKenzie et al., 2011). Limited research has examined the effects of alcohol and cannabis co-use on mental health, despite co-use being associated with greater negative social consequences than either substance alone (Yurasek et al., 2017) and evidence regarding increased risk for depression (Pacek et al., 2013). The current study aims to examine the relationship between number of past year alcohol and cannabis co-use days and depression and anxiety levels in adolescents after a three-week abstinence period. The sample included 90 participants ages 16-25 (M age=21.14, 44% female). Past year alcohol, cannabis, and co-use days were determined by self-report on the Timeline Followback, which assessed frequency and quantity of substance use. State anxiety levels and depression symptoms were measured on the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. Separate multiple linear regressions were conducted to evaluate whether past year alcohol use, cannabis use, and co-use days were significantly associated with sub-clinical anxiety and depression symptoms, after controlling for age and sex. Results indicated that the overall models accounting for substance use days and demographics were not significantly associated with anxiety and depression levels (p’s>.05). Findings suggest that chronic effects of alcohol, cannabis, and co-use are not significantly related to mood symptoms after a period of abstinence. While not directly assessed here, instead, substance use may relate to mood more acutely. Future longitudinal research is necessary to provide more causal models and understanding of the effects of substance use on mood symptoms.

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Apr 16th, 12:00 AM

Co-Use of Alcohol and Cannabis: Associations with Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Adolescents

Alcohol and cannabis are frequently used substances among adolescents and have been associated with negative mental health outcomes. Specifically, research has shown alcohol (Hassan, 2018) and cannabis use (Lisdahl et al., 2007; Wright et al., 2016) independently linked with greater depressive symptoms, with the relationship with anxiety symptoms being less clear (Keith et al., 2015; McKenzie et al., 2011). Limited research has examined the effects of alcohol and cannabis co-use on mental health, despite co-use being associated with greater negative social consequences than either substance alone (Yurasek et al., 2017) and evidence regarding increased risk for depression (Pacek et al., 2013). The current study aims to examine the relationship between number of past year alcohol and cannabis co-use days and depression and anxiety levels in adolescents after a three-week abstinence period. The sample included 90 participants ages 16-25 (M age=21.14, 44% female). Past year alcohol, cannabis, and co-use days were determined by self-report on the Timeline Followback, which assessed frequency and quantity of substance use. State anxiety levels and depression symptoms were measured on the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. Separate multiple linear regressions were conducted to evaluate whether past year alcohol use, cannabis use, and co-use days were significantly associated with sub-clinical anxiety and depression symptoms, after controlling for age and sex. Results indicated that the overall models accounting for substance use days and demographics were not significantly associated with anxiety and depression levels (p’s>.05). Findings suggest that chronic effects of alcohol, cannabis, and co-use are not significantly related to mood symptoms after a period of abstinence. While not directly assessed here, instead, substance use may relate to mood more acutely. Future longitudinal research is necessary to provide more causal models and understanding of the effects of substance use on mood symptoms.