Event Title

Development of a Parent Readiness Scale for Expectant Parents

Mentor 1

Paul Florsheim

Mentor 2

Stephanie Moravec

Mentor 3

Marin Schmitt

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

The goal of this study was to develop a new measure to assess first time expectant parents’ level of readiness for parenthood. Based on a review of the research literature, we identified a need for such a measure to assist parent educators and prenatal providers working with first time parents. We used a brief demographic survey published via Mturks, a crowdsourcing marketplace supported by Amazon, and used by researchers to identify specific subject pools, to identify first time pregnant women and expectant fathers. Participants who reported they were first-time parents, under the age 40, and fluent in English were selected to participate in the second set of questionnaires. The primary questionnaire was the Parent Readiness Scale (PRS), which consisted of 5 readiness subscales: role, coparenting, knowledge emotional control and support. The second questionnaire was the “Markers of Adulthood” (MOA) survey. We also asked participants if they would attend a parenting or coparenting program, if available. 40 eligible participants completed the questionnaires. Reliability analyses indicated that all PRS subscales except knowledge were reliable. Pearson correlation analyses indicated statistically significant associations between all five PRS subscales and the MOA survey (p<.05). 55% of the expectant parents said that if offered, they would attend a co-parenting program and 65% said they’d attend a parenting education program. Ironically, those reporting more positive coparenting scores were more likely to report wanting relationship support. Similarly, those parents who reported being more knowledgeable and emotionally ready were more likely say they’d attend a parenting education program. Results provide some evidence for the validity and reliability of a new scale to assess parent readiness. Also, while most parents are interested in services to prepare them for parenthood, those who report feeling less ready are less willing to attend programs.

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Apr 16th, 12:00 AM

Development of a Parent Readiness Scale for Expectant Parents

The goal of this study was to develop a new measure to assess first time expectant parents’ level of readiness for parenthood. Based on a review of the research literature, we identified a need for such a measure to assist parent educators and prenatal providers working with first time parents. We used a brief demographic survey published via Mturks, a crowdsourcing marketplace supported by Amazon, and used by researchers to identify specific subject pools, to identify first time pregnant women and expectant fathers. Participants who reported they were first-time parents, under the age 40, and fluent in English were selected to participate in the second set of questionnaires. The primary questionnaire was the Parent Readiness Scale (PRS), which consisted of 5 readiness subscales: role, coparenting, knowledge emotional control and support. The second questionnaire was the “Markers of Adulthood” (MOA) survey. We also asked participants if they would attend a parenting or coparenting program, if available. 40 eligible participants completed the questionnaires. Reliability analyses indicated that all PRS subscales except knowledge were reliable. Pearson correlation analyses indicated statistically significant associations between all five PRS subscales and the MOA survey (p<.05). 55% of the expectant parents said that if offered, they would attend a co-parenting program and 65% said they’d attend a parenting education program. Ironically, those reporting more positive coparenting scores were more likely to report wanting relationship support. Similarly, those parents who reported being more knowledgeable and emotionally ready were more likely say they’d attend a parenting education program. Results provide some evidence for the validity and reliability of a new scale to assess parent readiness. Also, while most parents are interested in services to prepare them for parenthood, those who report feeling less ready are less willing to attend programs.