Event Title

Assessing Conflict Monitoring in OCD Subtypes using Error-related Brain Activity

Mentor 1

Maryam Ayazi

Mentor 2

Bryce Arseneau

Mentor 3

Han Joo Lee

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

Obsessions can be broken into two subtypes, autogenous and reactive. Autogenous obsessions (AO) appear abruptly without the presence of external stimuli and are identified as unrealistic or irrational thoughts (e.g., aggressive, sexual, and immoral thoughts or impulses). Reactive obsessions (RO) are evoked by external stimuli and are identified as realistic worries that are perceived as threats (e.g., contamination, mistakes, asymmetry, etc.). Such intrusions found in OCD may show a deficiency in conflict monitoring processes. Studies have shown that people with high OC symptoms and General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) have impaired conflict monitoring that has been reflected by exaggerated Error-Related Negativity (ERN). The purpose of this study is to measure conflict monitoring to understand the difference between these subtypes and then to compare with GAD that in previous studies showed to have enhanced ERN following errors. We will look at these measurements in people with high OC symptoms (AO and RO) as well as people with high general anxiety symptoms and compare them with healthy controls. Studies have shown differences in ERN magnitude in response to an error at event-related potential (ERP) studies in those with OCD and GAD compared to healthy controls. Using an EEG experiment, we look to measure the influence of conflict monitoring on ERN magnitude and post-error slowing during an arrow version of Eriksen flanker task that previous studies have not investigated between AO and RO groups. We will assess post-error slowing between all groups as another factor that could be impacted by conflict monitoring. We expect AOs to show a higher ERN magnitude and the largest post-error slowing compared to ROs, GAD, and healthy controls. Keywords: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), conflict monitoring, Error-Related Negativity (ERN), Event-Related Potential (ERP)

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Apr 16th, 12:00 AM

Assessing Conflict Monitoring in OCD Subtypes using Error-related Brain Activity

Obsessions can be broken into two subtypes, autogenous and reactive. Autogenous obsessions (AO) appear abruptly without the presence of external stimuli and are identified as unrealistic or irrational thoughts (e.g., aggressive, sexual, and immoral thoughts or impulses). Reactive obsessions (RO) are evoked by external stimuli and are identified as realistic worries that are perceived as threats (e.g., contamination, mistakes, asymmetry, etc.). Such intrusions found in OCD may show a deficiency in conflict monitoring processes. Studies have shown that people with high OC symptoms and General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) have impaired conflict monitoring that has been reflected by exaggerated Error-Related Negativity (ERN). The purpose of this study is to measure conflict monitoring to understand the difference between these subtypes and then to compare with GAD that in previous studies showed to have enhanced ERN following errors. We will look at these measurements in people with high OC symptoms (AO and RO) as well as people with high general anxiety symptoms and compare them with healthy controls. Studies have shown differences in ERN magnitude in response to an error at event-related potential (ERP) studies in those with OCD and GAD compared to healthy controls. Using an EEG experiment, we look to measure the influence of conflict monitoring on ERN magnitude and post-error slowing during an arrow version of Eriksen flanker task that previous studies have not investigated between AO and RO groups. We will assess post-error slowing between all groups as another factor that could be impacted by conflict monitoring. We expect AOs to show a higher ERN magnitude and the largest post-error slowing compared to ROs, GAD, and healthy controls. Keywords: Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), conflict monitoring, Error-Related Negativity (ERN), Event-Related Potential (ERP)