Event Title

The Microbiota of Artemia used as Feed for Juvenile Fish in Aquaculture

Mentor 1

Ryan Newton

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

Artemia are a type of tiny crustacean that are widely used as feed in aquaculture. Development of more optimized feeds for efficient fish growth in order to meet growing demand in the industry is a key priority. Artemia-based feeds make up a large portion of the diet of juvenile fish. The bacterial species present in this early food source may contribute to those that colonize the guts of young fish and thus dictate later diet-gut-microbiota interactions. The makeup of the intestinal microbiota can affect the health, growth rate, and viability of these fish to a significant degree. In order to understand what exactly is present in the food given to aquaculture fish at this crucial time of development, surveys of the microbial makeup of Artemia guts are necessary. Here we will develop and describe a protocol for extracting DNA from microorganisms associated with Artemia, sequencing the DNA, and comparing it to the microorganisms we found previously were common in aquaculture fish fed Artemia at an early life stage. We expect to find that some bacteria associated with Artemia are common gut colonizers of these fish. This study will provide a refence point for future feed optimization by concretely determining typical Artemia feed microbiome makeup, as well as determining the degree of crossover colonization to juvenile fish.

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Apr 16th, 12:00 AM

The Microbiota of Artemia used as Feed for Juvenile Fish in Aquaculture

Artemia are a type of tiny crustacean that are widely used as feed in aquaculture. Development of more optimized feeds for efficient fish growth in order to meet growing demand in the industry is a key priority. Artemia-based feeds make up a large portion of the diet of juvenile fish. The bacterial species present in this early food source may contribute to those that colonize the guts of young fish and thus dictate later diet-gut-microbiota interactions. The makeup of the intestinal microbiota can affect the health, growth rate, and viability of these fish to a significant degree. In order to understand what exactly is present in the food given to aquaculture fish at this crucial time of development, surveys of the microbial makeup of Artemia guts are necessary. Here we will develop and describe a protocol for extracting DNA from microorganisms associated with Artemia, sequencing the DNA, and comparing it to the microorganisms we found previously were common in aquaculture fish fed Artemia at an early life stage. We expect to find that some bacteria associated with Artemia are common gut colonizers of these fish. This study will provide a refence point for future feed optimization by concretely determining typical Artemia feed microbiome makeup, as well as determining the degree of crossover colonization to juvenile fish.