Event Title

Preliminary Data on the Feasibility of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Protocols

Mentor 1

Shelley Lund

Start Date

16-4-2021 12:00 AM

Description

Individuals with severe speech or language disorders use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods to communicate in their everyday lives. AAC includes a wide range of systems or devices that are used to supplement or replace spoken language. It is often classified into two broad categories: low-tech or high-tech devices. Low tech devices refer to systems that are not electrical or battery-operated. They are pictures of symbols, words, or phrases on a board or book. High tech devices are electronic, computerized devices that utilize computer-generated speech, and may employ eye-tracking or other access methods. With the wide variety of AAC devices available, AAC assessments pose a challenge to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to complete accurately and confidently. The AAC Clinical Assessment Project team developed four comprehensive, evidence-based protocols for SLPs to evaluate individuals for AAC systems in clinical practice. The four protocols focus on the following groups: children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), children with cerebral palsy (CP), adults with aphasia, and adults with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). For this study, twenty SLPs who specialize in AAC will evaluate the feasibility of using the protocols. The participating SLPs will use the protocols to assist in the decision-making process of the AAC strategy or system that is most beneficial for client communication. After the use of the protocol, SLPs will complete an online Qualtrics survey. They will evaluate the usefulness of the protocol by section using a Likert-type rating scale and responding to open-ended questions. Although data has not been collected, we can anticipate the SLPs will rate the protocol as a useful component of their assessment practice. If the ratings are not positive, we will revise the protocol based on the feedback given.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 12:00 AM

Preliminary Data on the Feasibility of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Protocols

Individuals with severe speech or language disorders use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) methods to communicate in their everyday lives. AAC includes a wide range of systems or devices that are used to supplement or replace spoken language. It is often classified into two broad categories: low-tech or high-tech devices. Low tech devices refer to systems that are not electrical or battery-operated. They are pictures of symbols, words, or phrases on a board or book. High tech devices are electronic, computerized devices that utilize computer-generated speech, and may employ eye-tracking or other access methods. With the wide variety of AAC devices available, AAC assessments pose a challenge to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to complete accurately and confidently. The AAC Clinical Assessment Project team developed four comprehensive, evidence-based protocols for SLPs to evaluate individuals for AAC systems in clinical practice. The four protocols focus on the following groups: children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), children with cerebral palsy (CP), adults with aphasia, and adults with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). For this study, twenty SLPs who specialize in AAC will evaluate the feasibility of using the protocols. The participating SLPs will use the protocols to assist in the decision-making process of the AAC strategy or system that is most beneficial for client communication. After the use of the protocol, SLPs will complete an online Qualtrics survey. They will evaluate the usefulness of the protocol by section using a Likert-type rating scale and responding to open-ended questions. Although data has not been collected, we can anticipate the SLPs will rate the protocol as a useful component of their assessment practice. If the ratings are not positive, we will revise the protocol based on the feedback given.