Event Title

Cannabis Use, Aerobic Exercise, and Internalizing Symptoms Amongst Adolescents

Location

Krista Lisdahl

Start Date

10-5-2022 10:00 AM

Description

Cannabis is widely used drug in the United States by youth and is associated with increased levels of internalizing symptoms, including depressive and anxiety symptoms. Research has shown that cannabis use and aerobic fitness (AF) predicts better performance on neurocognitive tasks, thus, AF may be helpful for young cannabis users in improving psychological and cognitive functioning. Few studies have examined the relationship between AF and internalizing symptoms among young cannabis users. This study investigated differences in AF level and internalizing symptoms among cannabis users and controls. It was hypothesized that cannabis users with increased AF would report lower internalizing symptoms. 75 participants, (25 cannabis users (1x weekly in the past year); 67.57% Caucasian; 52.7% male) were recruited from the community to complete three weeks of monitored abstinence from drugs and alcohol. Across five sessions, participants completed questionnaires assessing internalizing symptoms, AF, and detailed past-year substance use patterns. A one-way ANOVA examined differences of AF and internalizing symptoms among young cannabis users. There were no statistically significant relationships between cannabis use, AF and internalizing symptoms in this sample. AF levels and internalizing symptoms did not differ among young cannabis users compared to controls. This sample had low variability in internalizing symptoms likely due to the exclusion of major mood and anxiety disorders. Future research should investigate the effects of cannabis use, AF, and more severe levels of internalizing symptoms. Additionally, future research is needed to understand potential mechanisms of AF reducing neurocognitive impacts of cannabis use during adolescence.

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Cannabis Use, Aerobic Exercise, and Internalizing Symptoms Amongst Adolescents

Krista Lisdahl

Cannabis is widely used drug in the United States by youth and is associated with increased levels of internalizing symptoms, including depressive and anxiety symptoms. Research has shown that cannabis use and aerobic fitness (AF) predicts better performance on neurocognitive tasks, thus, AF may be helpful for young cannabis users in improving psychological and cognitive functioning. Few studies have examined the relationship between AF and internalizing symptoms among young cannabis users. This study investigated differences in AF level and internalizing symptoms among cannabis users and controls. It was hypothesized that cannabis users with increased AF would report lower internalizing symptoms. 75 participants, (25 cannabis users (1x weekly in the past year); 67.57% Caucasian; 52.7% male) were recruited from the community to complete three weeks of monitored abstinence from drugs and alcohol. Across five sessions, participants completed questionnaires assessing internalizing symptoms, AF, and detailed past-year substance use patterns. A one-way ANOVA examined differences of AF and internalizing symptoms among young cannabis users. There were no statistically significant relationships between cannabis use, AF and internalizing symptoms in this sample. AF levels and internalizing symptoms did not differ among young cannabis users compared to controls. This sample had low variability in internalizing symptoms likely due to the exclusion of major mood and anxiety disorders. Future research should investigate the effects of cannabis use, AF, and more severe levels of internalizing symptoms. Additionally, future research is needed to understand potential mechanisms of AF reducing neurocognitive impacts of cannabis use during adolescence.