Event Title

The Utility of Wearable Cameras in Capturing Physical Activity Behaviors from Functionally Limited Adults

Location

Scott Strath

Start Date

10-5-2022 10:00 AM

Description

Wearable cameras (WCs) are a widely used method of data collection used to determine PA behavior, but few studies have implemented them in observing PA behaviors for individuals with functional limitations. To capture physical activity (PA) behaviors of functionally limited adults by WC images to discover their movement patterns and types of PA behaviors they engage in within a free-living environment. Participants (n=30) were asked to complete a battery of physical tests to determine their level of functionality and were assigned to three groups; normal (NM), n=15, impaired (IM), n=9, limited (LM), n=6. Participants were then asked to wear an OMG Life Autographer WC for one full day within a free-living environment. The images obtained were coded using a schema developed form the Compendium of Physical Activities that determined participants’ posture and activity, revealing patterns of movement. To determine utility of the WC, we looked at wear compliance, average number of images captured between groups, and the percentage of images that were uncodeable between groups. Wear compliance was defined as at least 10 hours of wear. Average wear time was 9.44 hours for NM, 12.96 hours for IM and 9.76 hours for LM with 53%, 66% and 50% of NM, IM and LM individuals meeting compliance, respectively. Mean numbers of images for NM, IM, and LM individuals as follows: 1066.98, 1446.41, 682.63 (SD=476.24, 391.98, 580.85). An average of 0.34, 0.80, and 2.62% (SD=0.76, 1.12, 2.47) of images were uncodeable for NM, IM, and LM individuals, respectively. A high percentage of WC images from functionally limited adults can be used, but low wear compliance and low image numbers were seen. Future directions include determining why functionally limited individuals were less compliant with WC use and ways to increase compliance.

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

The Utility of Wearable Cameras in Capturing Physical Activity Behaviors from Functionally Limited Adults

Scott Strath

Wearable cameras (WCs) are a widely used method of data collection used to determine PA behavior, but few studies have implemented them in observing PA behaviors for individuals with functional limitations. To capture physical activity (PA) behaviors of functionally limited adults by WC images to discover their movement patterns and types of PA behaviors they engage in within a free-living environment. Participants (n=30) were asked to complete a battery of physical tests to determine their level of functionality and were assigned to three groups; normal (NM), n=15, impaired (IM), n=9, limited (LM), n=6. Participants were then asked to wear an OMG Life Autographer WC for one full day within a free-living environment. The images obtained were coded using a schema developed form the Compendium of Physical Activities that determined participants’ posture and activity, revealing patterns of movement. To determine utility of the WC, we looked at wear compliance, average number of images captured between groups, and the percentage of images that were uncodeable between groups. Wear compliance was defined as at least 10 hours of wear. Average wear time was 9.44 hours for NM, 12.96 hours for IM and 9.76 hours for LM with 53%, 66% and 50% of NM, IM and LM individuals meeting compliance, respectively. Mean numbers of images for NM, IM, and LM individuals as follows: 1066.98, 1446.41, 682.63 (SD=476.24, 391.98, 580.85). An average of 0.34, 0.80, and 2.62% (SD=0.76, 1.12, 2.47) of images were uncodeable for NM, IM, and LM individuals, respectively. A high percentage of WC images from functionally limited adults can be used, but low wear compliance and low image numbers were seen. Future directions include determining why functionally limited individuals were less compliant with WC use and ways to increase compliance.