Event Title

STARS@UWM: The Search for Pulsars

Location

David Kaplan

Start Date

10-5-2022 10:00 AM

Description

Pulsars are a type of star that are incredibly dense and small. As pulsars rotate, they release beams of radiation that can be detected from Earth as pulses, similar to the workings of a lighthouse. This unique pulse of radiation allows for novel ways to study the universe, the most exciting being the potential to detect previously undiscoverable gravitational waves. On the Student Team of Astrophysics ResearcherS (STARS), undergraduate students join the search for new pulsars and contribute towards the goals of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav). Students remotely observe from UWM using the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia. Previously, the Arecibo Telescope in Puerto Rico was also used. Students analyze the resulting data from both telescopes to discover and study these neutron stars. Students at UWM also collaborate with other institutions around the country, including Franklin & Marshall College, University of Washington – Bothell, Kenyon College, Hillsdale College, West Virginia University, and more. Students from UWM have also participated in astronomy-related projects internationally in places such as China, Italy, India, South Africa, and Australia.

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

STARS@UWM: The Search for Pulsars

David Kaplan

Pulsars are a type of star that are incredibly dense and small. As pulsars rotate, they release beams of radiation that can be detected from Earth as pulses, similar to the workings of a lighthouse. This unique pulse of radiation allows for novel ways to study the universe, the most exciting being the potential to detect previously undiscoverable gravitational waves. On the Student Team of Astrophysics ResearcherS (STARS), undergraduate students join the search for new pulsars and contribute towards the goals of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav). Students remotely observe from UWM using the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia. Previously, the Arecibo Telescope in Puerto Rico was also used. Students analyze the resulting data from both telescopes to discover and study these neutron stars. Students at UWM also collaborate with other institutions around the country, including Franklin & Marshall College, University of Washington – Bothell, Kenyon College, Hillsdale College, West Virginia University, and more. Students from UWM have also participated in astronomy-related projects internationally in places such as China, Italy, India, South Africa, and Australia.