Event Title

Disordered Eating: A Program Focused on Addressing the Roots of This Potentially Deadly Habit

Mentor 1

Rose Hennessy Garza

Start Date

28-4-2023 12:00 AM

Description

Disorder eating is when an individual engages in food and dieting habits that are restrictive, compulsive, or irregular. Disordered eating is very similar to an eating disorder, but what really separates the two is that an eating disorder is diagnosed by a medical professional. In the United States, its estimated that between 10-20% of women and 4-10% of men who are college aged, struggle with an eating disorder. Those percentages only represent individuals diagnosed with an eating disorder, many more students are suspected of practicing disordered eating habits, as well as having other unhealthy mindsets around food and weight. If an individual keeps up with these habits, they can lead to many negatively and occasionally fatal health outcomes. Programing is needed to address this problem. A modified version of Intervention Mapping will be used to plan a hypothetical program. Literature will be reviewed to define the problem and identify risk/protective factors for modification. An informal review of literature for evidence-based strategies & behavioral health theories will be conducted as well. The objective of this program is to reduce disordered eating habits on campus and increase college students’ self- confidence by enhancing their knowledge and giving them skills to cope with these issues. Using evidence-based strategies and Attribution Theory, a logic-model will be developed to include various activities and resources for students that will provide skills that promote healthy eating habits, along with confidence building and understanding to why they are exhibiting these habits. By basing public health programs in theory and evidence, this will help the public health practice overall. Being able to intervene with students early on will assist with addressing disordered eating habits before they cause any detrimental health outcomes.

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Apr 28th, 12:00 AM

Disordered Eating: A Program Focused on Addressing the Roots of This Potentially Deadly Habit

Disorder eating is when an individual engages in food and dieting habits that are restrictive, compulsive, or irregular. Disordered eating is very similar to an eating disorder, but what really separates the two is that an eating disorder is diagnosed by a medical professional. In the United States, its estimated that between 10-20% of women and 4-10% of men who are college aged, struggle with an eating disorder. Those percentages only represent individuals diagnosed with an eating disorder, many more students are suspected of practicing disordered eating habits, as well as having other unhealthy mindsets around food and weight. If an individual keeps up with these habits, they can lead to many negatively and occasionally fatal health outcomes. Programing is needed to address this problem. A modified version of Intervention Mapping will be used to plan a hypothetical program. Literature will be reviewed to define the problem and identify risk/protective factors for modification. An informal review of literature for evidence-based strategies & behavioral health theories will be conducted as well. The objective of this program is to reduce disordered eating habits on campus and increase college students’ self- confidence by enhancing their knowledge and giving them skills to cope with these issues. Using evidence-based strategies and Attribution Theory, a logic-model will be developed to include various activities and resources for students that will provide skills that promote healthy eating habits, along with confidence building and understanding to why they are exhibiting these habits. By basing public health programs in theory and evidence, this will help the public health practice overall. Being able to intervene with students early on will assist with addressing disordered eating habits before they cause any detrimental health outcomes.