Event Title

Campus Racial Climate

Mentor 1

Elena Izaksonas

Location

Union 240A

Start Date

24-4-2015 2:00 PM

Description

The purpose of this research project is to understand students’ perceptions, especially students of color, on racial climate at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Campus racial climate is broadly defined as the extent to which students of color feel safe and valued on campus. The climate includes attitudes, experiences, and behaviors that affect the campus and surrounding community. In this research project, we highlight the stories and experiences from the students’ view on racial climate as recent events on campus against Hmong and in the Eau Claire community have demonstrated a need to have solutions that will reduce race-related issues on a continual basis. Using aversive racism and intergroup conflict theories as the theoretical framework, we analyzed data from interviews conducted during the 2013-2014 academic year using a series content analyses. In addition, we collected data through focus groups during the 2014-2015 academic year form a similar sample to compare and contrast our initial findings. Results suggest there were significant differences in responses of whites and students of color. Common themes of white privilege and oppression emerged. These findings offer clues on ways to improve campus racial climate.

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Apr 24th, 2:00 PM

Campus Racial Climate

Union 240A

The purpose of this research project is to understand students’ perceptions, especially students of color, on racial climate at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. Campus racial climate is broadly defined as the extent to which students of color feel safe and valued on campus. The climate includes attitudes, experiences, and behaviors that affect the campus and surrounding community. In this research project, we highlight the stories and experiences from the students’ view on racial climate as recent events on campus against Hmong and in the Eau Claire community have demonstrated a need to have solutions that will reduce race-related issues on a continual basis. Using aversive racism and intergroup conflict theories as the theoretical framework, we analyzed data from interviews conducted during the 2013-2014 academic year using a series content analyses. In addition, we collected data through focus groups during the 2014-2015 academic year form a similar sample to compare and contrast our initial findings. Results suggest there were significant differences in responses of whites and students of color. Common themes of white privilege and oppression emerged. These findings offer clues on ways to improve campus racial climate.