Event Title

Lost in Conversation: Listening and Inattentional Blindness

Mentor 1

Dr. Eleni Pinnow

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

While there is research examining different ways to induce Inattentional Blindness (IB) and Inattentional Deafness (ID), there is little research currently examining whether it is possible to induce IB with an auditory task. IB and ID refer to the phenomenon where one fails to see or hear something when they are distracted. Participants received one of three sets of instructions (watch the video, count the number of bags in the video, or pay attention to the audio clip playing a conversation) to follow while watching a video and completed surveys immediately following the video. The video featured a scene of a mall food court where a bag was stolen during the video. There was not a significant difference between conditions in inducing IB. There was not a significant difference between conditions in the average accuracy of responses or the average confidence rating for responses. The listening task failed to be distracting enough to induce IB and thus did not support the hypothesis. Future research may involve requiring participants to engage in a conversation, rather than simply listening to one, in order to increase the level of distraction induced by the auditory task.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Lost in Conversation: Listening and Inattentional Blindness

Union Wisconsin Room

While there is research examining different ways to induce Inattentional Blindness (IB) and Inattentional Deafness (ID), there is little research currently examining whether it is possible to induce IB with an auditory task. IB and ID refer to the phenomenon where one fails to see or hear something when they are distracted. Participants received one of three sets of instructions (watch the video, count the number of bags in the video, or pay attention to the audio clip playing a conversation) to follow while watching a video and completed surveys immediately following the video. The video featured a scene of a mall food court where a bag was stolen during the video. There was not a significant difference between conditions in inducing IB. There was not a significant difference between conditions in the average accuracy of responses or the average confidence rating for responses. The listening task failed to be distracting enough to induce IB and thus did not support the hypothesis. Future research may involve requiring participants to engage in a conversation, rather than simply listening to one, in order to increase the level of distraction induced by the auditory task.