Event Title

Multi-scale Computational Model Development for Drug Delivery Kinetics and Mechanical Behavior of Drug-coated Balloon (DCB) Medical Devices

Mentor 1

Changsoo Kim

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

Drug-coated balloons (DCB) are medical devices to treat narrowed diseased arteries. They have recently received tremendous attention as alternatives to drug-eluting stents (DES) for local drug delivery in percutaneous arterial interventions in light of studies suggesting that sufficient tissue concentrations of anti-restenosis drugs can be achieved through their use. As need for better functioning with reduced clinical adverse effects, nonpermanent arterial medical devices become more prevalent. In addition to the pharmaceutical kinetics from DCB medical devices, understanding the mechanical behaviors during procedure is also vital to improving upon already existing products, because the stress accumulation from DCB products is closely related to the occurrence of restenosis, i.e., abnormal tissue growth inside the vessel walls. There currently exist few studies concerning modeling of DCB devices within superficial arterial environments for such a purpose. The overall aim of this project is to develop an advanced multi-scale in silico computational model of drug release kinetics and mechanical behaviors in DCB devices mounted on balloon catheters. In particular, the mechanical aspect of DCB procedure is focused on in this poster presentation. This task was accomplished employing finite element analysis (FEA) computations, wherein which simplified geometries of the commercial Medtronic IN.PACT Admiral medical device and femoral popliteal artery are evaluated. With this computational technique, dynamic simulations of balloon-in-artery expansion were conducted, and resulting stress distributions have been systematically calculated and analyzed. Through this work, we specifically examined the effects of patient ages, coating thicknesses, and coating polymer types on the stress distributions in the DCB coating and arterial walls. These factors are important in manufacturing the commercial DCB products. The results indicate that higher stresses are accumulated as the coating thickness and the age of patient increase. Such prediction results produced using the current computational model can be applied to develop more advanced DCB medical applications with higher safety and efficacy.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Multi-scale Computational Model Development for Drug Delivery Kinetics and Mechanical Behavior of Drug-coated Balloon (DCB) Medical Devices

Union Wisconsin Room

Drug-coated balloons (DCB) are medical devices to treat narrowed diseased arteries. They have recently received tremendous attention as alternatives to drug-eluting stents (DES) for local drug delivery in percutaneous arterial interventions in light of studies suggesting that sufficient tissue concentrations of anti-restenosis drugs can be achieved through their use. As need for better functioning with reduced clinical adverse effects, nonpermanent arterial medical devices become more prevalent. In addition to the pharmaceutical kinetics from DCB medical devices, understanding the mechanical behaviors during procedure is also vital to improving upon already existing products, because the stress accumulation from DCB products is closely related to the occurrence of restenosis, i.e., abnormal tissue growth inside the vessel walls. There currently exist few studies concerning modeling of DCB devices within superficial arterial environments for such a purpose. The overall aim of this project is to develop an advanced multi-scale in silico computational model of drug release kinetics and mechanical behaviors in DCB devices mounted on balloon catheters. In particular, the mechanical aspect of DCB procedure is focused on in this poster presentation. This task was accomplished employing finite element analysis (FEA) computations, wherein which simplified geometries of the commercial Medtronic IN.PACT Admiral medical device and femoral popliteal artery are evaluated. With this computational technique, dynamic simulations of balloon-in-artery expansion were conducted, and resulting stress distributions have been systematically calculated and analyzed. Through this work, we specifically examined the effects of patient ages, coating thicknesses, and coating polymer types on the stress distributions in the DCB coating and arterial walls. These factors are important in manufacturing the commercial DCB products. The results indicate that higher stresses are accumulated as the coating thickness and the age of patient increase. Such prediction results produced using the current computational model can be applied to develop more advanced DCB medical applications with higher safety and efficacy.