Event Title

Development of a Quantitative Spasticity Measure for Routine Clinical Practice – Translating Modified Ashworth Scale into Quantitative Kinematic and Kinetic Values

Mentor 1

Ying-Chih Wang

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

Background and Rationale: Spasticity is a motor disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes. Clinically, it presents as increased resistance during passive movement at a joint site. Occurring in approximately one out of four stroke patients, spasticity is highly detrimental to participation in activities of daily living. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is the gold standard for assessing spasticity in stroke patients, but its subjectivity limits its reliability and sensitivity. Biomechanical and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated alternative methods for quantifying spasticity; however, the methodology of these studies is impractical in the clinical setting. Development of a crosswalk between the MAS and real neurophysiological properties is needed in order to increase objectivity and validly measure spasticity in patients in order to more accurately determine efficacy of current treatment and intervention approaches for spasticity in the clinical setting. Methods: A cross sectional study is underway wherein the level of spasticity in stroke survivors is being assessed. Surface electromyography and motion capture technology is being used to collect biomechanical data during administration of the MAS. A custom-made device will collect range of motion and resistance force simultaneously. We will then examine the association regarding scale steps in the MAS and changes in electromyography, catch angle, stretching velocity, as well as objective force measurements. With this data, we will fabricate a quantitative mechanical device to measure the muscle tone, catch angle, and resistance force due to passive stretch reflex in order to provide a clearer link between MAS ratings and neurophysiological properties. Results: The study is still ongoing and has not produced sufficient results to make conclusive statements. Conclusions: N/A

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Development of a Quantitative Spasticity Measure for Routine Clinical Practice – Translating Modified Ashworth Scale into Quantitative Kinematic and Kinetic Values

Union Wisconsin Room

Background and Rationale: Spasticity is a motor disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes. Clinically, it presents as increased resistance during passive movement at a joint site. Occurring in approximately one out of four stroke patients, spasticity is highly detrimental to participation in activities of daily living. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is the gold standard for assessing spasticity in stroke patients, but its subjectivity limits its reliability and sensitivity. Biomechanical and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated alternative methods for quantifying spasticity; however, the methodology of these studies is impractical in the clinical setting. Development of a crosswalk between the MAS and real neurophysiological properties is needed in order to increase objectivity and validly measure spasticity in patients in order to more accurately determine efficacy of current treatment and intervention approaches for spasticity in the clinical setting. Methods: A cross sectional study is underway wherein the level of spasticity in stroke survivors is being assessed. Surface electromyography and motion capture technology is being used to collect biomechanical data during administration of the MAS. A custom-made device will collect range of motion and resistance force simultaneously. We will then examine the association regarding scale steps in the MAS and changes in electromyography, catch angle, stretching velocity, as well as objective force measurements. With this data, we will fabricate a quantitative mechanical device to measure the muscle tone, catch angle, and resistance force due to passive stretch reflex in order to provide a clearer link between MAS ratings and neurophysiological properties. Results: The study is still ongoing and has not produced sufficient results to make conclusive statements. Conclusions: N/A