Event Title

Effects of Triclocarban on Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

Mentor 1

Dr. Elisabeth Harrahy

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are made up of a wide range of chemicals, some of which are not fully removed or broken down through regular wastewater treatment processes. Triclocarban is one such chemical. Though it helps to kill unwanted bacteria, it may also be toxic to aquatic organisms that live in waters that receive wastewater discharge. This study was designed to examine the toxicity of triclocarban to larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Two acute toxicity tests were conducted in which fathead minnows were exposed to six different concentrations of triclocarban ranging from 0 to 200 µg/L (1st test) and 0 to 400 µg/L (2nd test). We saw little mortality in the first test, so we increased concentrations in the second. Concentrations as low as 86.4 µg/L killed a significant percent of the minnows. Concentrations of triclocarban in wastewater effluent have been reported in the low µg/L-range. These results will be used to determine the best range of concentrations for the chronic toxicity test, in which we will examine the effects of triclocarban on growth of larval fathead minnows.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Effects of Triclocarban on Fathead Minnows (Pimephales promelas)

Union Wisconsin Room

Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are made up of a wide range of chemicals, some of which are not fully removed or broken down through regular wastewater treatment processes. Triclocarban is one such chemical. Though it helps to kill unwanted bacteria, it may also be toxic to aquatic organisms that live in waters that receive wastewater discharge. This study was designed to examine the toxicity of triclocarban to larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Two acute toxicity tests were conducted in which fathead minnows were exposed to six different concentrations of triclocarban ranging from 0 to 200 µg/L (1st test) and 0 to 400 µg/L (2nd test). We saw little mortality in the first test, so we increased concentrations in the second. Concentrations as low as 86.4 µg/L killed a significant percent of the minnows. Concentrations of triclocarban in wastewater effluent have been reported in the low µg/L-range. These results will be used to determine the best range of concentrations for the chronic toxicity test, in which we will examine the effects of triclocarban on growth of larval fathead minnows.