Event Title

Geographic Access to Breast Cancer Screening Facilities Among African American Women in Southeastern Wisconsin

Mentor 1

Dr. Sandra Millon Underwood

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 3:45 PM

Description

According to the National Cancer Institute SEER Program (2013), in comparison to other races, African American women have the second highest breast cancer incidence rate, yet the highest breast cancer mortality rate. The American Cancer Society (ACS, 2013) recommends that average-risk asymptomatic women 40 years of age and above receive yearly mammography and clinical breast examinations (CBE) to detect breast cancer in its earliest, most treatable stages with the goal of reducing mortality. In addition, although breast awareness is not a distinct screening modality, the ACS recommends that all women should be familiar with the normal appearance and feel of their breasts and report any changes they detect to their health care providers immediately. In the effort to reduce the burden of breast cancer borne by African American women, identifying African American women in the greatest need of breast cancer education, CBE, mammography screening, and breast care has been identified as a national priority. However, little is known about African American women’s ability to access breast care resources. Therefore, an exploratory study of the geographic location of breast cancer screening facilities and the influence of facility proximity on the screening practices of African American women was proposed. The study aimed to compare the availability of breast cancer screening facilities in different income-level zip codes in Southeastern Wisconsin and examine the relationship between breast cancer screening facility proximity to zip code of residence and the receipt of screening services among African American women 40 years of age and above in Southeastern Wisconsin. The Andersen Behavioral Model of Healthcare Utilization framework was used to guide this study. The study was undertaken using a descriptive cross-sectional design. Subjects were gathered via convenience sampling of African American women 40 years of age and older at community breast cancer awareness and screening events throughout Southeastern Wisconsin. Survey data reflective of zip code of residence and breast cancer screening practices was gathered from participants. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Findings indicated that there was limited access to breast cancer screening facilities in low-income neighborhoods in Southeastern Wisconsin. The limited availability of screening facilities was a barrier to the receipt of CBEs and mammography screening. Information gleaned from this study is being used to target programming to women with the greatest need of breast cancer screening.

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Apr 24th, 2:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Geographic Access to Breast Cancer Screening Facilities Among African American Women in Southeastern Wisconsin

Union Wisconsin Room

According to the National Cancer Institute SEER Program (2013), in comparison to other races, African American women have the second highest breast cancer incidence rate, yet the highest breast cancer mortality rate. The American Cancer Society (ACS, 2013) recommends that average-risk asymptomatic women 40 years of age and above receive yearly mammography and clinical breast examinations (CBE) to detect breast cancer in its earliest, most treatable stages with the goal of reducing mortality. In addition, although breast awareness is not a distinct screening modality, the ACS recommends that all women should be familiar with the normal appearance and feel of their breasts and report any changes they detect to their health care providers immediately. In the effort to reduce the burden of breast cancer borne by African American women, identifying African American women in the greatest need of breast cancer education, CBE, mammography screening, and breast care has been identified as a national priority. However, little is known about African American women’s ability to access breast care resources. Therefore, an exploratory study of the geographic location of breast cancer screening facilities and the influence of facility proximity on the screening practices of African American women was proposed. The study aimed to compare the availability of breast cancer screening facilities in different income-level zip codes in Southeastern Wisconsin and examine the relationship between breast cancer screening facility proximity to zip code of residence and the receipt of screening services among African American women 40 years of age and above in Southeastern Wisconsin. The Andersen Behavioral Model of Healthcare Utilization framework was used to guide this study. The study was undertaken using a descriptive cross-sectional design. Subjects were gathered via convenience sampling of African American women 40 years of age and older at community breast cancer awareness and screening events throughout Southeastern Wisconsin. Survey data reflective of zip code of residence and breast cancer screening practices was gathered from participants. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Findings indicated that there was limited access to breast cancer screening facilities in low-income neighborhoods in Southeastern Wisconsin. The limited availability of screening facilities was a barrier to the receipt of CBEs and mammography screening. Information gleaned from this study is being used to target programming to women with the greatest need of breast cancer screening.