Event Title

Cannabis Use and Sleep Quality in Emerging Adults

Mentor 1

Krista Lisdahl

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 3:45 PM

Description

Marijuana (MJ) is the most frequently used illicit drug in the United States, with 31% of young adults (ages 19-28) endorsing use during 2012 (Johnston et al., 2012). The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates sleep (Murillo-Rodriguez et al., 2011). Therefore, chronic use of exogenous cannabis (MJ) may downregulate endocannabinoids, leading to impaired sleep. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if past year MJ use predicted past month sleep quality in adolescents and emerging adults. The secondary aim was to determine if subclinical depressive symptoms moderated this relationship. We hypothesized that greater past year MJ use would be associated with poorer reported sleep quality. Participants included 42 emerging adult MJ users (exclusion criteria included Axis I psychiatric disorders, medical and neurologic disorders, and excessive other drug use). We measured MJ use (Timeline Follow Back), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory). We statistically controlled for genotype, age, gender, ethnicity, past year nicotine use, and past year alcohol use. Results revealed a dose dependent relationship between greater past year MJ use and decreased sleep quality. Increased depressive symptoms significantly predicted more sleep problems. Additionally, we found that depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between MJ use and sleep quality, such that those with increased MJ use and more depressive symptoms reported the most sleep problems. Longitudinal studies are need to further clarify these relationships.

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Apr 24th, 2:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Cannabis Use and Sleep Quality in Emerging Adults

Union Wisconsin Room

Marijuana (MJ) is the most frequently used illicit drug in the United States, with 31% of young adults (ages 19-28) endorsing use during 2012 (Johnston et al., 2012). The endogenous cannabinoid system modulates sleep (Murillo-Rodriguez et al., 2011). Therefore, chronic use of exogenous cannabis (MJ) may downregulate endocannabinoids, leading to impaired sleep. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if past year MJ use predicted past month sleep quality in adolescents and emerging adults. The secondary aim was to determine if subclinical depressive symptoms moderated this relationship. We hypothesized that greater past year MJ use would be associated with poorer reported sleep quality. Participants included 42 emerging adult MJ users (exclusion criteria included Axis I psychiatric disorders, medical and neurologic disorders, and excessive other drug use). We measured MJ use (Timeline Follow Back), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory). We statistically controlled for genotype, age, gender, ethnicity, past year nicotine use, and past year alcohol use. Results revealed a dose dependent relationship between greater past year MJ use and decreased sleep quality. Increased depressive symptoms significantly predicted more sleep problems. Additionally, we found that depressive symptoms moderated the relationship between MJ use and sleep quality, such that those with increased MJ use and more depressive symptoms reported the most sleep problems. Longitudinal studies are need to further clarify these relationships.