Event Title

Analysis of Conditions That Produce QLCSs and Supercells

Mentor 1

John Frye

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 3:45 PM

Description

This research focuses on storms known as quasi-linear convective systems, or QLCSs, which are long lines of thunderstorms. They are capable of producing high winds, hail, and tornadoes. The goal of this project was to investigate differences between various events, so that potential impacts can be forecasted with greater accuracy. To do this, four cases from 2003 to 2013 were chosen: one storm that produced mainly high winds, one that produced mainly hail, one which produced tornadoes in supercells, and one which produced tornadoes without supercells present. The storms all occurred between the months of April and September, and all impacted Wisconsin. This provided geographic consistency, and limited the storms to the months in which they most commonly form. Conditions such as convective available potential energy, wind shear, and atmospheric pressure were analyzed, in order to visualize the differences between storms. Radar data was also scrutinized for signatures such as hook echoes and bow echoes, which can indicate tornadoes or high winds, respectively. Results of the project indicate that there are differences between these types of storms. However, to truly determine what differentiates these storms, many more cases must be analyzed.

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Apr 24th, 2:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Analysis of Conditions That Produce QLCSs and Supercells

Union Wisconsin Room

This research focuses on storms known as quasi-linear convective systems, or QLCSs, which are long lines of thunderstorms. They are capable of producing high winds, hail, and tornadoes. The goal of this project was to investigate differences between various events, so that potential impacts can be forecasted with greater accuracy. To do this, four cases from 2003 to 2013 were chosen: one storm that produced mainly high winds, one that produced mainly hail, one which produced tornadoes in supercells, and one which produced tornadoes without supercells present. The storms all occurred between the months of April and September, and all impacted Wisconsin. This provided geographic consistency, and limited the storms to the months in which they most commonly form. Conditions such as convective available potential energy, wind shear, and atmospheric pressure were analyzed, in order to visualize the differences between storms. Radar data was also scrutinized for signatures such as hook echoes and bow echoes, which can indicate tornadoes or high winds, respectively. Results of the project indicate that there are differences between these types of storms. However, to truly determine what differentiates these storms, many more cases must be analyzed.