Event Title

Hymenobacter Species Dominate Freshwater Biofilms

Mentor 1

Dr. Sabrina Mueller-Spitz

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 3:45 PM

Description

Freshwater biofilm formation is influenced by numerous factors such as nutrient availability, flow dynamics, and substrate type. These factors affect community succession, structure, and species diversity between nascent and mature biofilms. We are trying to understand mature biofilm composition occupying man-made structures in eutrophic freshwater. Common manmade substrates in the Fox River watershed include metal, wood, and concrete piers and docks. All three habitats shared Hymenobacter as the most dominant genera. The objective of this research was to determine if subpopulations of Hymenobacter favor different substrates. Hymenobacter sequences ranged from 4.2 to 23.3% of total bacterial community with over 80 operational taxonomic units (OTU) detected across the three substrates. Twelve OTUs inhabited all three environments showing various subpopulations are substrate generalists. The concrete substrate had the greatest total diversity and most unique OTUs. The wood and concrete substrates shared 22 OTUs whereas there was less overlap with metal. By comparison, three populations dominated the metal habitat comprising 89% of all Hymenobacter sequences detected. This reduction in OTU richness on metal substrates leads us to consider potential adaptations that have led to this substrate being less favorable, potentially related to more competitive microorganisms that are better suited to this microenvironment. The Hymenobacter dominance in freshwater biofilms allows us to hypothesize that this group has significant contribution to ecological processes. While Hymenobacter was present on all sampled substrates, the concrete environment provides the most suitable substrate favoring diversity. The large variance in OTUs present on other substrates points to taxa divergence to niche substrates, possibly based on attachment strategies or physiological adaptations.

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Apr 24th, 2:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Hymenobacter Species Dominate Freshwater Biofilms

Union Wisconsin Room

Freshwater biofilm formation is influenced by numerous factors such as nutrient availability, flow dynamics, and substrate type. These factors affect community succession, structure, and species diversity between nascent and mature biofilms. We are trying to understand mature biofilm composition occupying man-made structures in eutrophic freshwater. Common manmade substrates in the Fox River watershed include metal, wood, and concrete piers and docks. All three habitats shared Hymenobacter as the most dominant genera. The objective of this research was to determine if subpopulations of Hymenobacter favor different substrates. Hymenobacter sequences ranged from 4.2 to 23.3% of total bacterial community with over 80 operational taxonomic units (OTU) detected across the three substrates. Twelve OTUs inhabited all three environments showing various subpopulations are substrate generalists. The concrete substrate had the greatest total diversity and most unique OTUs. The wood and concrete substrates shared 22 OTUs whereas there was less overlap with metal. By comparison, three populations dominated the metal habitat comprising 89% of all Hymenobacter sequences detected. This reduction in OTU richness on metal substrates leads us to consider potential adaptations that have led to this substrate being less favorable, potentially related to more competitive microorganisms that are better suited to this microenvironment. The Hymenobacter dominance in freshwater biofilms allows us to hypothesize that this group has significant contribution to ecological processes. While Hymenobacter was present on all sampled substrates, the concrete environment provides the most suitable substrate favoring diversity. The large variance in OTUs present on other substrates points to taxa divergence to niche substrates, possibly based on attachment strategies or physiological adaptations.