Event Title

The Unexpected Results of Daily Painting

Mentor 1

Bethann Handzlik

Location

Fireside Lounge

Start Date

24-4-2015 9:40 AM

Description

I researched the relationship of painting each day, like exercise, and the outcome it would have on larger scale sustained projects. I thought daily painting would increase my ability to act naturally and more responsively to my larger subjects. I created 18 small exercise paintings that were accomplished in a two-week span and then began two larger scale projects. I found that the smaller studies which were less formal and not sustained, did increase my skill set and allowed me to approach the larger scale, more complex work with more confidence and freedom. I also quickly realized after about two weeks of daily painting I discovered that painting on a daily basis exhausted my will to improve my painting technique. I could not keep painting studies; day-to-day painting became more of an accomplishment in-itself rather than a tool to improve my abilities. I liken it to an athlete who strains their body, harder than is comfortable to tear their muscles, in order to improve strength and endurance, an end which is only possible with the proper rest time and fuel. Between the first and second large painting I created, I noticed an improvement. I will likely continue seeing improvements in the following paintings. The experience of doing this research ultimately taught me that painting is a relationship. It is best to paint when you want to and when you don’t feel like it too. And small studies and larger more complex works all contribute to the life of the painter.

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Apr 24th, 9:40 AM

The Unexpected Results of Daily Painting

Fireside Lounge

I researched the relationship of painting each day, like exercise, and the outcome it would have on larger scale sustained projects. I thought daily painting would increase my ability to act naturally and more responsively to my larger subjects. I created 18 small exercise paintings that were accomplished in a two-week span and then began two larger scale projects. I found that the smaller studies which were less formal and not sustained, did increase my skill set and allowed me to approach the larger scale, more complex work with more confidence and freedom. I also quickly realized after about two weeks of daily painting I discovered that painting on a daily basis exhausted my will to improve my painting technique. I could not keep painting studies; day-to-day painting became more of an accomplishment in-itself rather than a tool to improve my abilities. I liken it to an athlete who strains their body, harder than is comfortable to tear their muscles, in order to improve strength and endurance, an end which is only possible with the proper rest time and fuel. Between the first and second large painting I created, I noticed an improvement. I will likely continue seeing improvements in the following paintings. The experience of doing this research ultimately taught me that painting is a relationship. It is best to paint when you want to and when you don’t feel like it too. And small studies and larger more complex works all contribute to the life of the painter.