Event Title

Adsorption of/Model Organic Compounds/by Natural and Engineered Porous Material in Aqueous Phase

Mentor 1

Marcia Silva

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Organic pollutants sourced from pharmaceuticals, industry, personal care products and agriculture are one of the major residual contaminants albeit at trace levels in secondary treated wastewater and some drinking waters. Examples of thesepollutants include PCBs, dioxins, pesticide groups, andpharmaceuticals. In this study, we aim to investigate the adsorption capacity and ability to remove the model organic compounds – nonionic disperse blue 26 (DP 26) and cationic methylene blue (MB) – by natural and novel engineered porous materials. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the adsorption isotherms of these compounds onto the adsorbents. Porous particles of modified (B, C, and D) and unmodified forms (A), were tested. A is the parent particle cleaned, and the B, C&D refer to different methods of fabrication with addition of graphene to the particles. In each test, different concentrations of DP26 and MB were used. A solution with known concentration of a given model compound was stirred with the particles in a beaker at a constant rate, allowing sufficient time for adsorption equilibrium. Aliquots were then drawn out at time intervals and tested for residual concentration, converted from absorbancethrough a calibration curve. Batch experiments with the highest concentration tested (40mg/L) presented evidence that Particle A had the lowest removal of both DP26 and MB (12 % and 13%), respectively and that Particles D had the highest removal (40% and 58%), respectively. These two latter particles have a related modification. It can be concluded that modification types C&Dare the best for the model pollutant. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the negatively charged natural material has the highest removal rate for the cationic dye, especially after treatment when it became more negatively charged and that addition of non-ionic surfaces improves the organic compounds’ removal.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Adsorption of/Model Organic Compounds/by Natural and Engineered Porous Material in Aqueous Phase

Union Wisconsin Room

Organic pollutants sourced from pharmaceuticals, industry, personal care products and agriculture are one of the major residual contaminants albeit at trace levels in secondary treated wastewater and some drinking waters. Examples of thesepollutants include PCBs, dioxins, pesticide groups, andpharmaceuticals. In this study, we aim to investigate the adsorption capacity and ability to remove the model organic compounds – nonionic disperse blue 26 (DP 26) and cationic methylene blue (MB) – by natural and novel engineered porous materials. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the adsorption isotherms of these compounds onto the adsorbents. Porous particles of modified (B, C, and D) and unmodified forms (A), were tested. A is the parent particle cleaned, and the B, C&D refer to different methods of fabrication with addition of graphene to the particles. In each test, different concentrations of DP26 and MB were used. A solution with known concentration of a given model compound was stirred with the particles in a beaker at a constant rate, allowing sufficient time for adsorption equilibrium. Aliquots were then drawn out at time intervals and tested for residual concentration, converted from absorbancethrough a calibration curve. Batch experiments with the highest concentration tested (40mg/L) presented evidence that Particle A had the lowest removal of both DP26 and MB (12 % and 13%), respectively and that Particles D had the highest removal (40% and 58%), respectively. These two latter particles have a related modification. It can be concluded that modification types C&Dare the best for the model pollutant. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the negatively charged natural material has the highest removal rate for the cationic dye, especially after treatment when it became more negatively charged and that addition of non-ionic surfaces improves the organic compounds’ removal.