Event Title

Stress Sensors for Biomedical Applications

Mentor 1

Chiu Law

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 4:00 PM

Description

Research was conducted to develop a design for an effective sensor to be used in biomedical applications, specifically to monitor the stress on joint implants received by patients. The sensors will be synthesized using a manetostrictive composite material (MCM) of Terfenol-D (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2), epoxy resin, and ferromagnetic material. The sensing is based on the Villari effect, or inverse magnetostriction. The magnetic domains in the sensor will line up and expand, thus modifying the magnetic properties of the material when an external mechanical stress is applied. A magnetic circuit will be fabricated to wirelessly sense the stress in the sensor, and further research will be gathered to compare and contrast the prototype to sensors for the same application currently available in the field. The goal is to use information about current sensors and the magnetic properties of the sensor that will be fabricated to create a less-invasive, effective, and wireless sensor to monitor joint implants.

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Stress Sensors for Biomedical Applications

Union Wisconsin Room

Research was conducted to develop a design for an effective sensor to be used in biomedical applications, specifically to monitor the stress on joint implants received by patients. The sensors will be synthesized using a manetostrictive composite material (MCM) of Terfenol-D (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe2), epoxy resin, and ferromagnetic material. The sensing is based on the Villari effect, or inverse magnetostriction. The magnetic domains in the sensor will line up and expand, thus modifying the magnetic properties of the material when an external mechanical stress is applied. A magnetic circuit will be fabricated to wirelessly sense the stress in the sensor, and further research will be gathered to compare and contrast the prototype to sensors for the same application currently available in the field. The goal is to use information about current sensors and the magnetic properties of the sensor that will be fabricated to create a less-invasive, effective, and wireless sensor to monitor joint implants.