Event Title

Bicycle Tire Stability and Handling Testing

Mentor 1

Andrew E Dressel

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 4:00 PM

Description

The objective of this project is to design a device to collect data on the mechanical properties of bicycle tires with the goal of validating Rotta's 2D model and enhancing the current bicycle model. In validating Rotta's 2D model, a better understanding of how bicycle tires behave will be achieved. This study will also take into account different parameters, such as tire size and construction methods. In addition, the data collected will enhance the current bicycle model and show how tire behavior influences bicycle stability and handling. By analyzing the combination of these two models, optimal tire design will be facilitated.

Six constraints govern the device's design: accept tires up to five inches wide, prevent wheel rotation about any axis and allow vertical and lateral movement, apply a vertical load to the wheel, measure vertical displacement and lateral force, and simulate various camber angles. The device uses a parallelogram design connecting the frame and fork together, thus allowing for vertical movement of the wheel, but preventing lateral movement or roll rotation. At the base of the frame, a steel plate will be mounted on a hinge and controlled by a screw. This screw will allow the plate to tilt, simulating the wheel at various camber angles. The device will collect data using various PASCO force sensors, and the data will be compiled using DataStudio.

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Bicycle Tire Stability and Handling Testing

Union Wisconsin Room

The objective of this project is to design a device to collect data on the mechanical properties of bicycle tires with the goal of validating Rotta's 2D model and enhancing the current bicycle model. In validating Rotta's 2D model, a better understanding of how bicycle tires behave will be achieved. This study will also take into account different parameters, such as tire size and construction methods. In addition, the data collected will enhance the current bicycle model and show how tire behavior influences bicycle stability and handling. By analyzing the combination of these two models, optimal tire design will be facilitated.

Six constraints govern the device's design: accept tires up to five inches wide, prevent wheel rotation about any axis and allow vertical and lateral movement, apply a vertical load to the wheel, measure vertical displacement and lateral force, and simulate various camber angles. The device uses a parallelogram design connecting the frame and fork together, thus allowing for vertical movement of the wheel, but preventing lateral movement or roll rotation. At the base of the frame, a steel plate will be mounted on a hinge and controlled by a screw. This screw will allow the plate to tilt, simulating the wheel at various camber angles. The device will collect data using various PASCO force sensors, and the data will be compiled using DataStudio.