Event Title

Lessons Learned: Historical and Policy Analysis of Emerging Infectious Diseases? The Case of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in the United States

Mentor 1

Dr. Aaron Buseh

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 4:00 PM

Description

Over 40 years ago, a poorly understood disease sent shockwaves throughout the public health community. The disease would later become known as Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) caused by the Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV). To date, HIV/AIDS continues to be a public health issue that carries stigma and fear of death, perceptions which affects treatment and prevention of the disease. What lessons can the public health community learn from the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the US that could be extrapolated in addressing current infectious diseases such as Ebola, Zika Virus etc? The purpose of this study is to conduct a historical analysis of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the US. The study focuses on developing a historical timeline, documenting populations initially affected by the disease; the US Government initial and current approaches to addressing HIV/AIDS. The role of the private sector and advocacy groups in addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the US will also be documented. This project employs a secondary historical analytical approach. Several databases will be used including information from Medline/PubMed; government related reports; and white papers developed by organizations/agencies involved in addressing HIV/AIDS.Critical findings include: (a) Slow response in addressing the HIV/AIDS disease by the US Public Health Service; (b) Development of public health policies that lacked evidenced-based research; (c) HIV/AIDS may be here to stay and should be viewed within the realm as a chronic disease; and (d) Engaging and partnering with local communities should be an essential component of any prevention and treatment strategies. This project provides relevant information that could be used by public health officials in planning and designing programs aimed at addressing current and future emerging infections such as the Zika disease.

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Lessons Learned: Historical and Policy Analysis of Emerging Infectious Diseases? The Case of the HIV/AIDS Epidemic in the United States

Union Wisconsin Room

Over 40 years ago, a poorly understood disease sent shockwaves throughout the public health community. The disease would later become known as Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) caused by the Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV). To date, HIV/AIDS continues to be a public health issue that carries stigma and fear of death, perceptions which affects treatment and prevention of the disease. What lessons can the public health community learn from the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the US that could be extrapolated in addressing current infectious diseases such as Ebola, Zika Virus etc? The purpose of this study is to conduct a historical analysis of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the US. The study focuses on developing a historical timeline, documenting populations initially affected by the disease; the US Government initial and current approaches to addressing HIV/AIDS. The role of the private sector and advocacy groups in addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the US will also be documented. This project employs a secondary historical analytical approach. Several databases will be used including information from Medline/PubMed; government related reports; and white papers developed by organizations/agencies involved in addressing HIV/AIDS.Critical findings include: (a) Slow response in addressing the HIV/AIDS disease by the US Public Health Service; (b) Development of public health policies that lacked evidenced-based research; (c) HIV/AIDS may be here to stay and should be viewed within the realm as a chronic disease; and (d) Engaging and partnering with local communities should be an essential component of any prevention and treatment strategies. This project provides relevant information that could be used by public health officials in planning and designing programs aimed at addressing current and future emerging infections such as the Zika disease.