Event Title

Magnetostrictive Response of Cellulose Nanofibril Composites

Mentor 1

Chiu Law

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

5-4-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2019 3:30 PM

Description

Previous research has been performed on cellulose nanofibril (CNF) Terfenol-D (T-D) magnetostrictive composites to determine the optimal volume fraction of T-D in CNF to achieve peak magnetostriction values similar to those of monolithic T-D. The volume fraction for T-D in CNF was theoretically determined and then experimentally measured via angular deflection. However, these tests are only able to measure the relative strain and not true strain of the composite. This research project aims to validate the previous experiments by measuring the composite’s true strain in a magnetic field at varying volume fractions to find the experimental optimal volume fraction. These tests will help determine other magnetomechanical properties, such as the magnetomechanical coupling factor, and the material properties of the composite. The optimal volume fraction for magnetostriction and the magnetomechanical coupling factor will be investigated, and composite properties at this fraction will be compared to those of monolithic T-D. Knowledge of these properties will determine the feasibility of this composite for applications involving piezoelectric laminate sensors and low-field magnetic sensors. An industry application of these sensors could be used in sensing stray magnetic fields coming from MRI machines during operation or could be used in energy harvesting fins. The processing of the composite samples into adhered layers with and without an embedded wire has been successful. Currently, material properties have been found by tensile testing the composite, but these results still need to be validated by using an embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. The FBG will also be able to measure the true strain of the composite under magnetic field, which will help validate the previous research. After tests with the FBG are completed, the next step will be to model the composite with a multiphysics simulation package, such as COMSOL, to explore the design of new experiments and to tests new applications of the composite.

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Apr 5th, 1:30 PM Apr 5th, 3:30 PM

Magnetostrictive Response of Cellulose Nanofibril Composites

Union Wisconsin Room

Previous research has been performed on cellulose nanofibril (CNF) Terfenol-D (T-D) magnetostrictive composites to determine the optimal volume fraction of T-D in CNF to achieve peak magnetostriction values similar to those of monolithic T-D. The volume fraction for T-D in CNF was theoretically determined and then experimentally measured via angular deflection. However, these tests are only able to measure the relative strain and not true strain of the composite. This research project aims to validate the previous experiments by measuring the composite’s true strain in a magnetic field at varying volume fractions to find the experimental optimal volume fraction. These tests will help determine other magnetomechanical properties, such as the magnetomechanical coupling factor, and the material properties of the composite. The optimal volume fraction for magnetostriction and the magnetomechanical coupling factor will be investigated, and composite properties at this fraction will be compared to those of monolithic T-D. Knowledge of these properties will determine the feasibility of this composite for applications involving piezoelectric laminate sensors and low-field magnetic sensors. An industry application of these sensors could be used in sensing stray magnetic fields coming from MRI machines during operation or could be used in energy harvesting fins. The processing of the composite samples into adhered layers with and without an embedded wire has been successful. Currently, material properties have been found by tensile testing the composite, but these results still need to be validated by using an embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. The FBG will also be able to measure the true strain of the composite under magnetic field, which will help validate the previous research. After tests with the FBG are completed, the next step will be to model the composite with a multiphysics simulation package, such as COMSOL, to explore the design of new experiments and to tests new applications of the composite.