Event Title

The Evolution of Microfluidic Device Synthesis for Single Molecule Trapping

Mentor 1

Jorg Woehl

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

5-4-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

5-4-2019 3:30 PM

Description

Understanding interactions between charged metal surfaces and electrolyte solutions is of vital interest to the One Molecule Group’s projects in electric double layer theory, DC corral trapping, and directed particle manipulation. The accuracy of our experiments requires synthesis of microfluidic devices with specific, nanoscale structures and controlled channel dimensions that allow for controlled visualization of molecules within electrolyte solutions. The creation of our microfluidic devices introduced difficulties in consistency stemming from areas such structural integrity and definition, channel depth control, and loss of solution within the channel. To ensure consistent data, our techniques have evolved to improve the creation of our devices in order to limit or remove these obstructions. Procedural adaptations have included solution sealing, channel rigidity, improved patterning and thickness during metal deposition, additional purification measures, and reducing penumbra effects. We will present the specific advancements we have added in the synthesis process of our devices, as well as future adaptations to reduce inconsistencies even further.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 1:30 PM Apr 5th, 3:30 PM

The Evolution of Microfluidic Device Synthesis for Single Molecule Trapping

Union Wisconsin Room

Understanding interactions between charged metal surfaces and electrolyte solutions is of vital interest to the One Molecule Group’s projects in electric double layer theory, DC corral trapping, and directed particle manipulation. The accuracy of our experiments requires synthesis of microfluidic devices with specific, nanoscale structures and controlled channel dimensions that allow for controlled visualization of molecules within electrolyte solutions. The creation of our microfluidic devices introduced difficulties in consistency stemming from areas such structural integrity and definition, channel depth control, and loss of solution within the channel. To ensure consistent data, our techniques have evolved to improve the creation of our devices in order to limit or remove these obstructions. Procedural adaptations have included solution sealing, channel rigidity, improved patterning and thickness during metal deposition, additional purification measures, and reducing penumbra effects. We will present the specific advancements we have added in the synthesis process of our devices, as well as future adaptations to reduce inconsistencies even further.